Page 1 of 30
RSS
Site logo for Modernist Estates

Modernist Estates

Listing modernist homes for sale, focussing on London post-war estates, plus findings on the way, including books, interviews, films and upcoming events. I also do this: thingsyoucanbuy.co.uk
Follow this Tumblr!
Follow me on Twitter

Email me

photo
Studio flatCullum Welch HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£380,000
Those of you who are regular readers of this blog will know that I have been looking to move for a while. In fact it’s the reason I started the blog in the first place, as a way to catalogue what I had seen and how much it cost, but everywhere I view leaves me a bit disappointed compared to my flat. In an ideal world I would keep my studio flat in Central London and buy somewhere by the sea—on stilts. Unfortunately, designing art catalogues is not as financially lucrative as one might hope and with a heavy heart I have taken the first serious step in moving and put my flat on the market. Here it is.
I’m not sure I am best person to give an objective point of view on this flat, but as you might imagine I have gone to some lengths since I bought it to restore it to it’s original beautiful self, but added a few modern essentials like HEATING. Look at my radiator, I really love my radiator. The flat has really lovely thoughtful features, like the exposed brick wall with built in shelving, quarry tiles in half the room creating a visual divide between the living and sleeping area, sliding doors in the hallway to maximise the space and lots of built in storage. I’d really like it if a nice person bought it and looked after it. 
You can view the listing here, or contact me directly and I’ll happily show you the flat and a give you a tour of Golden Lane Estate. Studio flatCullum Welch HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£380,000
Those of you who are regular readers of this blog will know that I have been looking to move for a while. In fact it’s the reason I started the blog in the first place, as a way to catalogue what I had seen and how much it cost, but everywhere I view leaves me a bit disappointed compared to my flat. In an ideal world I would keep my studio flat in Central London and buy somewhere by the sea—on stilts. Unfortunately, designing art catalogues is not as financially lucrative as one might hope and with a heavy heart I have taken the first serious step in moving and put my flat on the market. Here it is.
I’m not sure I am best person to give an objective point of view on this flat, but as you might imagine I have gone to some lengths since I bought it to restore it to it’s original beautiful self, but added a few modern essentials like HEATING. Look at my radiator, I really love my radiator. The flat has really lovely thoughtful features, like the exposed brick wall with built in shelving, quarry tiles in half the room creating a visual divide between the living and sleeping area, sliding doors in the hallway to maximise the space and lots of built in storage. I’d really like it if a nice person bought it and looked after it. 
You can view the listing here, or contact me directly and I’ll happily show you the flat and a give you a tour of Golden Lane Estate. Studio flatCullum Welch HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£380,000
Those of you who are regular readers of this blog will know that I have been looking to move for a while. In fact it’s the reason I started the blog in the first place, as a way to catalogue what I had seen and how much it cost, but everywhere I view leaves me a bit disappointed compared to my flat. In an ideal world I would keep my studio flat in Central London and buy somewhere by the sea—on stilts. Unfortunately, designing art catalogues is not as financially lucrative as one might hope and with a heavy heart I have taken the first serious step in moving and put my flat on the market. Here it is.
I’m not sure I am best person to give an objective point of view on this flat, but as you might imagine I have gone to some lengths since I bought it to restore it to it’s original beautiful self, but added a few modern essentials like HEATING. Look at my radiator, I really love my radiator. The flat has really lovely thoughtful features, like the exposed brick wall with built in shelving, quarry tiles in half the room creating a visual divide between the living and sleeping area, sliding doors in the hallway to maximise the space and lots of built in storage. I’d really like it if a nice person bought it and looked after it. 
You can view the listing here, or contact me directly and I’ll happily show you the flat and a give you a tour of Golden Lane Estate. Studio flatCullum Welch HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£380,000
Those of you who are regular readers of this blog will know that I have been looking to move for a while. In fact it’s the reason I started the blog in the first place, as a way to catalogue what I had seen and how much it cost, but everywhere I view leaves me a bit disappointed compared to my flat. In an ideal world I would keep my studio flat in Central London and buy somewhere by the sea—on stilts. Unfortunately, designing art catalogues is not as financially lucrative as one might hope and with a heavy heart I have taken the first serious step in moving and put my flat on the market. Here it is.
I’m not sure I am best person to give an objective point of view on this flat, but as you might imagine I have gone to some lengths since I bought it to restore it to it’s original beautiful self, but added a few modern essentials like HEATING. Look at my radiator, I really love my radiator. The flat has really lovely thoughtful features, like the exposed brick wall with built in shelving, quarry tiles in half the room creating a visual divide between the living and sleeping area, sliding doors in the hallway to maximise the space and lots of built in storage. I’d really like it if a nice person bought it and looked after it. 
You can view the listing here, or contact me directly and I’ll happily show you the flat and a give you a tour of Golden Lane Estate. Studio flatCullum Welch HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£380,000
Those of you who are regular readers of this blog will know that I have been looking to move for a while. In fact it’s the reason I started the blog in the first place, as a way to catalogue what I had seen and how much it cost, but everywhere I view leaves me a bit disappointed compared to my flat. In an ideal world I would keep my studio flat in Central London and buy somewhere by the sea—on stilts. Unfortunately, designing art catalogues is not as financially lucrative as one might hope and with a heavy heart I have taken the first serious step in moving and put my flat on the market. Here it is.
I’m not sure I am best person to give an objective point of view on this flat, but as you might imagine I have gone to some lengths since I bought it to restore it to it’s original beautiful self, but added a few modern essentials like HEATING. Look at my radiator, I really love my radiator. The flat has really lovely thoughtful features, like the exposed brick wall with built in shelving, quarry tiles in half the room creating a visual divide between the living and sleeping area, sliding doors in the hallway to maximise the space and lots of built in storage. I’d really like it if a nice person bought it and looked after it. 
You can view the listing here, or contact me directly and I’ll happily show you the flat and a give you a tour of Golden Lane Estate. Studio flatCullum Welch HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£380,000
Those of you who are regular readers of this blog will know that I have been looking to move for a while. In fact it’s the reason I started the blog in the first place, as a way to catalogue what I had seen and how much it cost, but everywhere I view leaves me a bit disappointed compared to my flat. In an ideal world I would keep my studio flat in Central London and buy somewhere by the sea—on stilts. Unfortunately, designing art catalogues is not as financially lucrative as one might hope and with a heavy heart I have taken the first serious step in moving and put my flat on the market. Here it is.
I’m not sure I am best person to give an objective point of view on this flat, but as you might imagine I have gone to some lengths since I bought it to restore it to it’s original beautiful self, but added a few modern essentials like HEATING. Look at my radiator, I really love my radiator. The flat has really lovely thoughtful features, like the exposed brick wall with built in shelving, quarry tiles in half the room creating a visual divide between the living and sleeping area, sliding doors in the hallway to maximise the space and lots of built in storage. I’d really like it if a nice person bought it and looked after it. 
You can view the listing here, or contact me directly and I’ll happily show you the flat and a give you a tour of Golden Lane Estate.

Studio flat
Cullum Welch House
Golden Lane Estate
London EC1
£380,000

Those of you who are regular readers of this blog will know that I have been looking to move for a while. In fact it’s the reason I started the blog in the first place, as a way to catalogue what I had seen and how much it cost, but everywhere I view leaves me a bit disappointed compared to my flat. In an ideal world I would keep my studio flat in Central London and buy somewhere by the sea—on stilts. Unfortunately, designing art catalogues is not as financially lucrative as one might hope and with a heavy heart I have taken the first serious step in moving and put my flat on the market. Here it is.

I’m not sure I am best person to give an objective point of view on this flat, but as you might imagine I have gone to some lengths since I bought it to restore it to it’s original beautiful self, but added a few modern essentials like HEATING. Look at my radiator, I really love my radiator. The flat has really lovely thoughtful features, like the exposed brick wall with built in shelving, quarry tiles in half the room creating a visual divide between the living and sleeping area, sliding doors in the hallway to maximise the space and lots of built in storage. I’d really like it if a nice person bought it and looked after it. 

You can view the listing here, or contact me directly and I’ll happily show you the flat and a give you a tour of Golden Lane Estate.

photo
1 Bedroom flat318–328 Hornsey RoadLondon N7£290,000
I’m taking a punt here and attributing Design 5 to this block, the architects behind St George’s Fields in Bayswater. There seems to be a lot of similarities, not least the colour of the brick, the ziggurat design and the the curvy wall dividing the living room and bedroom, it looks exactly the same as a St Georges Fields flat I visited some months ago. Am I wrong? Would love to find out more if anyone has any info. 
View the estate agents listing here. 1 Bedroom flat318–328 Hornsey RoadLondon N7£290,000
I’m taking a punt here and attributing Design 5 to this block, the architects behind St George’s Fields in Bayswater. There seems to be a lot of similarities, not least the colour of the brick, the ziggurat design and the the curvy wall dividing the living room and bedroom, it looks exactly the same as a St Georges Fields flat I visited some months ago. Am I wrong? Would love to find out more if anyone has any info. 
View the estate agents listing here. 1 Bedroom flat318–328 Hornsey RoadLondon N7£290,000
I’m taking a punt here and attributing Design 5 to this block, the architects behind St George’s Fields in Bayswater. There seems to be a lot of similarities, not least the colour of the brick, the ziggurat design and the the curvy wall dividing the living room and bedroom, it looks exactly the same as a St Georges Fields flat I visited some months ago. Am I wrong? Would love to find out more if anyone has any info. 
View the estate agents listing here.

1 Bedroom flat
318–328 Hornsey Road
London N7
£290,000

I’m taking a punt here and attributing Design 5 to this block, the architects behind St George’s Fields in Bayswater. There seems to be a lot of similarities, not least the colour of the brick, the ziggurat design and the the curvy wall dividing the living room and bedroom, it looks exactly the same as a St Georges Fields flat I visited some months ago. Am I wrong? Would love to find out more if anyone has any info. 

View the estate agents listing here.

photo

Brutalism: The Savage and the SublimeBarbican Centre6 November, 7pmTickets £10
You’ll enjoy this—as part of the Constructing Worlds exhibition at the Barbican (which opens next week) Sir Simon Jenkins, Douglas Murphy, Piers Gough and Jonathan Meades will ‘debate the aesthetics and morality of concrete’. 
Get your tickets here.

Brutalism: The Savage and the Sublime
Barbican Centre
6 November, 7pm
Tickets £10

You’ll enjoy this—as part of the Constructing Worlds exhibition at the Barbican (which opens next week) Sir Simon JenkinsDouglas Murphy, Piers Gough and Jonathan Meades will ‘debate the aesthetics and morality of concrete’. 

Get your tickets here.

photo
Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…



Ruth LangMyatt’s Fields SouthLondon SW9Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.
Tell us a bit about yourself I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 
Tell us about Myatt’s Fields SouthI remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 
How long have you lived here?I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 
Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.
Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.
The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.
What are the neighbours like?Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.
Best things about living here?It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.
Worst thing about living here?Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…

Ruth Lang
Myatt’s Fields South
London SW9

Earlier this year, Ruth (architect, educator, historian and all round clever-clogs) and I spent a Saturday afternoon looking for ‘estate pubs’ around Pimlico. We finally tracked down the formerly named Pimlico Tram in the Grade II listed Lillington Gardens—somewhat dismayed that it had been turned into ‘The Cask and Kitchen’ serving crafts beers and gourmet burgers, of course. After quite a lot of probing I discovered that Ruth lives in a house in a lesser known estate by Ted Hollamby, Myatt’s Field South. I’d recently visited the ‘under threat of demolition’ Cressingham Gardens in Tulse Hill, also by Hollamby, I was keen to see how it compared. Needless to say I proclaimed ‘You’d be perfect for the blog!’ — I’m not sure if it was the strong beer, but Ruth agreed without a fight and a few weeks ago I visited her home in South London.

Tell us a bit about yourself 
I’m currently doing a PHD on the London County Council Architects’ Department, from 1943 (and the publication of the County of London Plan) up until the devolution into the GLC in 1965. 

Tell us about Myatt’s Fields South
I remember being quite intimidated when I first came in to view the house — the perimeter of the estate is made up of a kind of castellation of deck access flats which cut it off from the surrounding streets, but once you’re inside there’s a series of small staggered terraces and townhouses arranged around squares, with lots of little pockets of green space at different levels which gives it a really open feel. There’s an incredible variety of different types of housing in here, designed to feel like one coherent whole. 

How long have you lived here?
I moved in just over two years ago, thinking ‘what am I doing moving to Brixton?’, which of course — unfortunately — has become *the* thing to do in the meantime. 

Did you know much about the estate before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?
I knew absolutely nothing, but I was drawn in instantly. I knew there was something special about this place — it’s been really well thought out in terms of how people use it, not just in the layout of the estate, but the for the spaces in the houses too. All the terraces have a private south facing garden, as well as a little buffer space at the front which gives another layer of privacy from the communal areas. I fell in love with the way light is brought into the centre of the house by the split roof section —the bathroom is like a cathedral, it’s a glorious space to lie in watching the sunset in summer, or with the rain lashing against the windows when it feels like the most protected space in the world. I’d always been curious about who designed it, but it’s only since I left my job to start a PhD last year that I found out it was by a team led by one of the key characters I’m researching, Ted Hollamby. 

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?
We thought the house was brick construction when I bought it — the council only found out that they’re all timber framed when they tried to undertake insulation works earlier this year. I was lucky though — this place had been derelict for 6 years, and was cited in a question to Eric Pickles in parliament as one of the examples of council housing that they had no idea what to do with. It was sold for (relative) peanuts at auction after that, completely gutted and turned for a profit — it’s sad to see the old auction photos of it in such a state with grilles over the windows, but if it hadn’t been, I don’t think I’d have ever been able to afford something like this.

Are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?
There’s none as I’m a freeholder, but the council tend the gardens on a nearly daily basis and trim back the plants every couple of months. If there’s more of a shift towards private ownership (the estate is about 2/3s council owned at the moment) I’m not sure what they’d do about that though.

The council still provides district heating for most of the tenants, although they’re forever trying to remove it. I’m hoping they don’t succeed as it’s all housed in a giant concrete submarine down the road, another brilliant quirk that shows what a sense of humour the architects had at the time.

What are the neighbours like?
Even as I was moving in everybody stopped to introduce themselves and to offer help. Coming from Shoreditch where I barely said good morning to my neighbours more than twice in four years, this was a bit of a shock at first. One of the nicest small design features is that the front doors open facing one of our neighbours, which means you bump into them for a chat quite a lot, and you know there’s always someone there with half an eye on what’s going on.

Best things about living here?
It’s brilliantly located, 10 minutes from Brixton, Stockwell or Oval, but as it’s pedestrianised it’s still incredibly quiet. It’s got so much character, especially in comparison to the anodyne development of the ‘Oval Quarter’ they’re building to replace the other half of the estate at Myatts Fields North, the design definitely contributes to building a sense of community too — it feels like home, rather than just a place I live.

Worst thing about living here?
Being a contributing factor in the inevitable gentrification of the area irks at my conscience still. I know it’s *people like me* who are changing the area from that we know and love, and it’s an awkward conundrum. I certainly couldn’t afford to buy here now, and I have a constant, underlying concern for how that’s going to alter the area in the long term, and what will happen to the people who are displaced. Land value is a prime factor in Myatt’s Fields North being demolished, and the influx of private (and buy-to-leave) ownership to what was previously a very close, social community.

Finally, money no object, where would you live?
I’m going to have to get back to you about this one, the list is just too long…

photo
Studio flat Crescent HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£450,000
One of only four flats in Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate by Chamberlin Powell and Bon, that has a balcony. And look at those floor-to-ceiling windows — swoooon. I think I read somewhere, that initially all the flats were meant to have balconies, but I think the money ran out. I think. The advantage of this particular layout compared to the others in this block, is that that built-in wardrobes, which normally sit awkwardly in the corner of the living room, here divide the room in two to create the separate sleeping area.  
View the listing here.  Studio flat Crescent HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£450,000
One of only four flats in Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate by Chamberlin Powell and Bon, that has a balcony. And look at those floor-to-ceiling windows — swoooon. I think I read somewhere, that initially all the flats were meant to have balconies, but I think the money ran out. I think. The advantage of this particular layout compared to the others in this block, is that that built-in wardrobes, which normally sit awkwardly in the corner of the living room, here divide the room in two to create the separate sleeping area.  
View the listing here.  Studio flat Crescent HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£450,000
One of only four flats in Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate by Chamberlin Powell and Bon, that has a balcony. And look at those floor-to-ceiling windows — swoooon. I think I read somewhere, that initially all the flats were meant to have balconies, but I think the money ran out. I think. The advantage of this particular layout compared to the others in this block, is that that built-in wardrobes, which normally sit awkwardly in the corner of the living room, here divide the room in two to create the separate sleeping area.  
View the listing here.  Studio flat Crescent HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£450,000
One of only four flats in Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate by Chamberlin Powell and Bon, that has a balcony. And look at those floor-to-ceiling windows — swoooon. I think I read somewhere, that initially all the flats were meant to have balconies, but I think the money ran out. I think. The advantage of this particular layout compared to the others in this block, is that that built-in wardrobes, which normally sit awkwardly in the corner of the living room, here divide the room in two to create the separate sleeping area.  
View the listing here.  Studio flat Crescent HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£450,000
One of only four flats in Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate by Chamberlin Powell and Bon, that has a balcony. And look at those floor-to-ceiling windows — swoooon. I think I read somewhere, that initially all the flats were meant to have balconies, but I think the money ran out. I think. The advantage of this particular layout compared to the others in this block, is that that built-in wardrobes, which normally sit awkwardly in the corner of the living room, here divide the room in two to create the separate sleeping area.  
View the listing here.  Studio flat Crescent HouseGolden Lane EstateLondon EC1£450,000
One of only four flats in Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate by Chamberlin Powell and Bon, that has a balcony. And look at those floor-to-ceiling windows — swoooon. I think I read somewhere, that initially all the flats were meant to have balconies, but I think the money ran out. I think. The advantage of this particular layout compared to the others in this block, is that that built-in wardrobes, which normally sit awkwardly in the corner of the living room, here divide the room in two to create the separate sleeping area.  
View the listing here. 

Studio flat 
Crescent House
Golden Lane Estate
London EC1
£450,000

One of only four flats in Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate by Chamberlin Powell and Bon, that has a balcony. And look at those floor-to-ceiling windows — swoooon. I think I read somewhere, that initially all the flats were meant to have balconies, but I think the money ran out. I think. 

The advantage of this particular layout compared to the others in this block, is that that built-in wardrobes, which normally sit awkwardly in the corner of the living room, here divide the room in two to create the separate sleeping area.  

View the listing here

photo

Routemaster Architecture ToursGreat news — there are three more tours planned for this autumn. Passengers on these road trips will not only have the chance to explore London on-board the fantastic Routemaster, they’ll also be accompanied by some of London’s best-known architectural commentators. 
Visions of Utopian Living Saturday 27 September, 10.30am – 4.00pm Adult £25, Students £20 Visions of Utopian living is a brand new Routemaster tour exploring utopia in London’s architecture. This Routemaster tour sets out to explore buildings in London that were designed as utopian experiments or with utopian ideals. Along the way, passengers will hear specialist talks from John Allan, Magnus Englund, and Charlie Warde and receive tours of iconic buildings including the Lawn Road Flats in Hampstead and the Balfron Tower in Poplar. Tickets here.

60s Society and Style with Richard Weight Saturday 4 October, 10.30am – 4.30pm Adult £25, Students £20 Another new Routemaster tour exploring 1960s society and style in London’s architecture. Led by author and broadcaster Richard Weight, an authority on modern Britain who specialises in the national identity of the British people, this Routemaster tour sets out to explore the iconic architecture that played a large part in London society during the 1960s. Tickets here.
The Goldfinger Tour with Joe Kerr Saturday 11 October, 9.30am–4.30pm Adult £25, Students £20 The Goldfinger Tour is led by Royal College of Art lecturer and architectural historian Joe Kerr. Starting at his famous London landmark the Trellick Tower, and exploring the interiors of National Trust property 2 Willow Road, the Haggerston School and the Balfron Tower. Tickets here.

Routemaster Architecture Tours
Great news — there are three more tours planned for this autumn. Passengers on these road trips will not only have the chance to explore London on-board the fantastic Routemaster, they’ll also be accompanied by some of London’s best-known architectural commentators. 

Visions of Utopian Living 
Saturday 27 September, 10.30am – 4.00pm 
Adult £25, Students £20 
Visions of Utopian living is a brand new Routemaster tour exploring utopia in London’s architecture. This Routemaster tour sets out to explore buildings in London that were designed as utopian experiments or with utopian ideals. Along the way, passengers will hear specialist talks from John Allan, Magnus Englund, and Charlie Warde and receive tours of iconic buildings including the Lawn Road Flats in Hampstead and the Balfron Tower in Poplar. Tickets here.

60s Society and Style with Richard Weight 
Saturday 4 October, 10.30am – 4.30pm 
Adult £25, Students £20 
Another new Routemaster tour exploring 1960s society and style in London’s architecture. Led by author and broadcaster Richard Weight, an authority on modern Britain who specialises in the national identity of the British people, this Routemaster tour sets out to explore the iconic architecture that played a large part in London society during the 1960s. Tickets here.

The Goldfinger Tour with Joe Kerr 
Saturday 11 October, 9.30am–4.30pm 
Adult £25, Students £20 
The Goldfinger Tour is led by Royal College of Art lecturer and architectural historian Joe Kerr. Starting at his famous London landmark the Trellick Tower, and exploring the interiors of National Trust property 2 Willow Road, the Haggerston School and the Balfron Tower. Tickets here.

photo
London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Royal Festival Hall London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Churchill Gardens Pumphouse, on the cover of L'architecture d'aujord'hui London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Golden Lane Estate London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Fulwell Cross Library London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Perronet House London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78
Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011
Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958
Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950
Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmAs part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968
Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Pullman Court

London Open House
20–21 September 2014
Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:

31b St Mary’s Road
SW19 7BP
One of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.

Saturday: 10am–4pm
Event/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 

Whittington Estate
8 Stoneleigh Terrace
(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)
N19 5TY
Built during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 

Sunday: 10am-to-5pm
NB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.
Last tour 4pm
Tube: Archway

Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate
13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, 
NW8 0SF
The last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.

Saturday: 10am–5pm
First come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.
Last entry 4.30pm
Tube: Swiss Cottage
Architect: Neave Brown
Year Built: 1968–79

Balfron Tower
St Leonard’s Road E14 0QT
Trellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.

Saturday: 1–5pm
Half-hourly tours, first come basis.
Last tour 4.30pm
DLR: All Saints, Langdon Park

Cressingham Gardens
Rotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QN

Low-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.

Saturday: 10am–5pm 
Sunday:10am–5pm
Regular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.
Entry: Rotunda, private homes.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;
Rail: Herne Hill, Brixton
Architect: Ted Hollamby
Year Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic
26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QY

Unlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.

Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm 
First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918
Last entry 4.45pm
Tube: Notting Hill Gate;
Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel Stepansky
Year Built 1970

Fullwell Cross Library
140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EA
The library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.

Saturday: 9.30am–4pm
Talk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.
Last entry 3.30pm
Tube: Barkingside, Fairlop
Architect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C Connell
Year Built: 1958–68

Golden Lane Estate
4 Bayer House
EC1Y 0RN
Part of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.

Sunday: 11am–5pm
Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.
Last tour 4.30pm
Tube: Barbican
Architect: Chamberlin, Powell & Bon
Year Built: 1957

Greenside Primary School
Westville Road, W12 9PT
One of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.

Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm 
Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.
Last entry 4.30pm
Tube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;
Architect: Goldfinger, Erno
Year Built: 1952

Guildhall Library
Aldermanbury EC2V 7HH

Purpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.

Saturday: 9.30am–5pm
Half-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.
Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;
Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son Partners
Year Built: 1974

Haggerston School
Weymouth Terrace, E2 8LS
Grade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.

Saturday: 1–4.30pm
Hourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.
Last Entry Time
Last tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.
Tube: Hoxton
Architect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti Architects
Year Built: 1963-65/2011

Highpoint

North Hill, N6 4BA
Grade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.

Saturday: 10am-to-5pm
Regular tours, pre-book ONLY at 
http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.
Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.
Tube: Highgate
Architect: Lubetkin & Tecton


Langham House Close, Flats
Ham Common, TW10 7JE
A landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.

Saturday: 10am–5pm
First come basis, queuing if necessary.
Last entry 5pm.
Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.
Rail: Richmond, Kingston;
then 65 bus to Ham Common
Architect: Stirling and Gowan
Year Built: 1958

Perronet House
48, 74 & 79 Perronet House,

Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)
Elephant and Castle SE1 6JS
Purpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.

Saturday: 1–5pm
First come basis
Last entry 4.45pm
Tube/Rail: Elephant & Castle
Architect: Sir Roger Walters
Year Built: 1970

Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)
The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road

SW1V 3JF
Churchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.

Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm 
Regular tours, first come basis.
Last entry 4.30pm
Tube: Pimlico
Architect: Powell and Moya
Year Built: 1950

Pullman Court
Streatham Hill, SW2 4SZ
Grade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.

Sunday: 11am–5pm
As part of London Open House weekend Pullman Court in Streatham will be taking a fresh look at Modernism. The show includes access to flats,a photographic exhibition of architecture from the mid-20th century and contemporary art. The show will feature images of modernist architecture in Caracas from the 1940s to the 1960s, and site-specific works by London-based artist Jaime Gili and Lothar Goetz, plus a new moving image work by Lisa Castagner – and Pullman Court itself.

Tube/Rail: Brixton;
Rail: Streatham Hill
Architect: Frederick Gibberd
Year Built: 1936

Quaker Meeting House,
Wanstead, Bush Road
E11 3AU
Modernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.

Sunday: 1–5pm
Last entry 5.15pm
Entry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadow
Tube: Leytonstone
Architect: Norman Frith
Year Built: 1968

Royal Festival Hall
Belvedere Road, SE1 8XX
The major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.

Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm 
Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.

Tube: Embankment
Tube/Rail: Charing Cross, Waterloo
Architect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)
Year Built: 1951/2007

The Pioneer Health Centre
St Mary’s Road, SE15 2EE
Grade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.

Sunday: 11am–2pm
Hourly tours, first come basis.
Photographic display of building’s former use.
Last tour 1pm
How to get there
Tube/Rail: New Cross Gate;
Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;
Architect: Sir E Owen Williams
Year Built: 1935

8 & 10 Walters Way
Honor Oak Park, SE23 3LH
A close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.

Sunday 1–6pm
Regular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.
Last entry 5.45pm
Rail/Overground: Honor Oak Park
Architect: Walter Segal
Year Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walk
Meet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre Street

SW10 0DS
Designed by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.

Duration 2 hours.
Tube: Sloane Square, Earls Court
Architect: Eric Lyons (Principal)
Year Built: 1969–76

Full listings on the Open House website.

photo
2 Bedroom flatDraper HouseElephant and CastleLondon SE1£365,000
Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.
As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.
View the listing here. 

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com 2 Bedroom flatDraper HouseElephant and CastleLondon SE1£365,000
Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.
As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.
View the listing here. 

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com 2 Bedroom flatDraper HouseElephant and CastleLondon SE1£365,000
Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.
As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.
View the listing here. 

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com 2 Bedroom flatDraper HouseElephant and CastleLondon SE1£365,000
Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.
As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.
View the listing here. 

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com 2 Bedroom flatDraper HouseElephant and CastleLondon SE1£365,000
Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.
As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.
View the listing here. 

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com 2 Bedroom flatDraper HouseElephant and CastleLondon SE1£365,000
Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.
As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.
View the listing here. 

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com 2 Bedroom flatDraper HouseElephant and CastleLondon SE1£365,000
Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.
As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.
View the listing here. 

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com

2 Bedroom flat
Draper House
Elephant and Castle
London SE1
£365,000

Draper House was the tallest residential tower in London when it was originally completed in 1965, and I was lucky enough to visit a resident there a few weeks ago (I’ll post the pics and interview on Modernist Lives soon). Sadly a lot of of original features, including a beautiful concrete mural in the lobby have been covered up, but the quality of the building is still very evident. The apartments are arranged as maisonettes lined up on opposing sides of a central corridor with the lower level of each maisonette having its own balcony.

As with similar concrete blocks, mortgage lenders are unlikely to lend on this, so you’d need to be a cash buyer—hence the ‘reasonable’ asking price.

View the listing here

Exterior image via skyscrapernews.com

photo
2 Bedroom flatExeter HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£540,000
I really don’t know what to say about the interior of this two bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate, lets just say it’s going to be a bit of a project.
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate. The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
The estate was listed in Grade II in 2011, and the recent £10,000,000 refurbishment of the estate (including replacing all the windows) has been scrapped after a council report claimed less than a quarter of the work was finished after 18 months. There are also claims that the contractor had failed to get listed building consent for parts of the refurbishment from English Heritage.  One of the outcome of the controversy, is that the leaseholders on the Hallfield estate are considering taking legal action against CityWest Homes.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatExeter HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£540,000
I really don’t know what to say about the interior of this two bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate, lets just say it’s going to be a bit of a project.
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate. The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
The estate was listed in Grade II in 2011, and the recent £10,000,000 refurbishment of the estate (including replacing all the windows) has been scrapped after a council report claimed less than a quarter of the work was finished after 18 months. There are also claims that the contractor had failed to get listed building consent for parts of the refurbishment from English Heritage.  One of the outcome of the controversy, is that the leaseholders on the Hallfield estate are considering taking legal action against CityWest Homes.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatExeter HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£540,000
I really don’t know what to say about the interior of this two bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate, lets just say it’s going to be a bit of a project.
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate. The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
The estate was listed in Grade II in 2011, and the recent £10,000,000 refurbishment of the estate (including replacing all the windows) has been scrapped after a council report claimed less than a quarter of the work was finished after 18 months. There are also claims that the contractor had failed to get listed building consent for parts of the refurbishment from English Heritage.  One of the outcome of the controversy, is that the leaseholders on the Hallfield estate are considering taking legal action against CityWest Homes.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatExeter HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£540,000
I really don’t know what to say about the interior of this two bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate, lets just say it’s going to be a bit of a project.
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate. The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
The estate was listed in Grade II in 2011, and the recent £10,000,000 refurbishment of the estate (including replacing all the windows) has been scrapped after a council report claimed less than a quarter of the work was finished after 18 months. There are also claims that the contractor had failed to get listed building consent for parts of the refurbishment from English Heritage.  One of the outcome of the controversy, is that the leaseholders on the Hallfield estate are considering taking legal action against CityWest Homes.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatExeter HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£540,000
I really don’t know what to say about the interior of this two bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate, lets just say it’s going to be a bit of a project.
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate. The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
The estate was listed in Grade II in 2011, and the recent £10,000,000 refurbishment of the estate (including replacing all the windows) has been scrapped after a council report claimed less than a quarter of the work was finished after 18 months. There are also claims that the contractor had failed to get listed building consent for parts of the refurbishment from English Heritage.  One of the outcome of the controversy, is that the leaseholders on the Hallfield estate are considering taking legal action against CityWest Homes.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatExeter HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£540,000
I really don’t know what to say about the interior of this two bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate, lets just say it’s going to be a bit of a project.
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate. The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
The estate was listed in Grade II in 2011, and the recent £10,000,000 refurbishment of the estate (including replacing all the windows) has been scrapped after a council report claimed less than a quarter of the work was finished after 18 months. There are also claims that the contractor had failed to get listed building consent for parts of the refurbishment from English Heritage.  One of the outcome of the controversy, is that the leaseholders on the Hallfield estate are considering taking legal action against CityWest Homes.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Exeter House
Hallfield Estate
London W2
£540,000

I really don’t know what to say about the interior of this two bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate, lets just say it’s going to be a bit of a project.

Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.

The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate. The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.

The estate was listed in Grade II in 2011, and the recent £10,000,000 refurbishment of the estate (including replacing all the windows) has been scrapped after a council report claimed less than a quarter of the work was finished after 18 months. There are also claims that the contractor had failed to get listed building consent for parts of the refurbishment from English Heritage.  One of the outcome of the controversy, is that the leaseholders on the Hallfield estate are considering taking legal action against CityWest Homes.

View the listing here.

photo
2 Bedroom flatTrellick TowerGoldborne RoadLondon W10£630,000
There hasn’t been one of these Ernö Goldfinger flats on the market for a long time— but £630K — really? It will be interesting to see what happens. There’s nothing to like about the current interior, so you’d best put some money aside for that. The estate agents listing states is a duplex, but unfortunately there’s no floor plans. We know it’s on the 12th floor, it has a balcony and there’s a separate loo with ‘With low flush suite’(!).
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatTrellick TowerGoldborne RoadLondon W10£630,000
There hasn’t been one of these Ernö Goldfinger flats on the market for a long time— but £630K — really? It will be interesting to see what happens. There’s nothing to like about the current interior, so you’d best put some money aside for that. The estate agents listing states is a duplex, but unfortunately there’s no floor plans. We know it’s on the 12th floor, it has a balcony and there’s a separate loo with ‘With low flush suite’(!).
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatTrellick TowerGoldborne RoadLondon W10£630,000
There hasn’t been one of these Ernö Goldfinger flats on the market for a long time— but £630K — really? It will be interesting to see what happens. There’s nothing to like about the current interior, so you’d best put some money aside for that. The estate agents listing states is a duplex, but unfortunately there’s no floor plans. We know it’s on the 12th floor, it has a balcony and there’s a separate loo with ‘With low flush suite’(!).
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatTrellick TowerGoldborne RoadLondon W10£630,000
There hasn’t been one of these Ernö Goldfinger flats on the market for a long time— but £630K — really? It will be interesting to see what happens. There’s nothing to like about the current interior, so you’d best put some money aside for that. The estate agents listing states is a duplex, but unfortunately there’s no floor plans. We know it’s on the 12th floor, it has a balcony and there’s a separate loo with ‘With low flush suite’(!).
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatTrellick TowerGoldborne RoadLondon W10£630,000
There hasn’t been one of these Ernö Goldfinger flats on the market for a long time— but £630K — really? It will be interesting to see what happens. There’s nothing to like about the current interior, so you’d best put some money aside for that. The estate agents listing states is a duplex, but unfortunately there’s no floor plans. We know it’s on the 12th floor, it has a balcony and there’s a separate loo with ‘With low flush suite’(!).
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatTrellick TowerGoldborne RoadLondon W10£630,000
There hasn’t been one of these Ernö Goldfinger flats on the market for a long time— but £630K — really? It will be interesting to see what happens. There’s nothing to like about the current interior, so you’d best put some money aside for that. The estate agents listing states is a duplex, but unfortunately there’s no floor plans. We know it’s on the 12th floor, it has a balcony and there’s a separate loo with ‘With low flush suite’(!).
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Trellick Tower
Goldborne Road
London W10
£630,000

There hasn’t been one of these Ernö Goldfinger flats on the market for a long time— but £630K — really? It will be interesting to see what happens. There’s nothing to like about the current interior, so you’d best put some money aside for that. The estate agents listing states is a duplex, but unfortunately there’s no floor plans. We know it’s on the 12th floor, it has a balcony and there’s a separate loo with With low flush suite’(!).

View the listing here.

photo

AA Night School Run Club
After a lifetime of no exercise I took up running in January, and in two weeks time I’m running my first half marathon in Richmond. Over the last few weekends I’ve been increasing my mileage which has been a great opportunity to get a bit a lost and stumble across previously unexplored streets of London. If running and architecture is your thing, the AA  Night School and London Urban Visits have three urban running events lined up this Autumn worth signing up to. Each run will be approximately 10 kilometres with regular pauses along each route to rest, stretch, flex, and to talk about what you’ve seen or are about to see. 
13 OctoberNash Ramblas to the reinvention of Marylebone
3 NovemberTaming the Southbank: Pits, Skateboarders and Property Developers
8 December Soho Nights
View the AA website for booking and more information.
As an aside, I’m raising money for the mental health charity Mind, if you would like to sponsor my run I would be really grateful. You can do that here: justgiving.com/stefiorazi

AA Night School Run Club

After a lifetime of no exercise I took up running in January, and in two weeks time I’m running my first half marathon in Richmond. Over the last few weekends I’ve been increasing my mileage which has been a great opportunity to get a bit a lost and stumble across previously unexplored streets of London. If running and architecture is your thing, the AA  Night School and London Urban Visits have three urban running events lined up this Autumn worth signing up to. Each run will be approximately 10 kilometres with regular pauses along each route to rest, stretch, flex, and to talk about what you’ve seen or are about to see. 

13 October
Nash Ramblas to the reinvention of Marylebone

3 November
Taming the Southbank: Pits, Skateboarders and Property Developers

8 December 
Soho Nights

View the AA website for booking and more information.

As an aside, I’m raising money for the mental health charity Mind, if you would like to sponsor my run I would be really grateful. You can do that here: justgiving.com/stefiorazi

photo



1 Bedroom flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£425,000(£7,944 per square metre)
A one bedroom flat in Henry Wise House, Lillington Gardens designed in 1969–74 by Darbourne and Darke for the City of Westminster. Henry Wise House is the largest building from ‘phase one’ of the scheme which fronts Vauxhall Bridge Road. It contains ninety-six flats set over eight storeys. To Vauxhall Bridge Road the elevation is subdivided centrally by a projecting vertical lift shaft and its change in levels is marked by exposed floor plates. The horizontal projecting access galleries and regular pattern of projecting and recessed bays help to break down the elevations. To the garden side, its open projecting balconies, with set back glazing panels, dominate the facade.
View the listing here.
I’m looking for residents of Lillington Gardens to interview for this blog and forthcoming book, please get in touch if you would like to participate.





1 Bedroom flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£425,000(£7,944 per square metre)
A one bedroom flat in Henry Wise House, Lillington Gardens designed in 1969–74 by Darbourne and Darke for the City of Westminster. Henry Wise House is the largest building from ‘phase one’ of the scheme which fronts Vauxhall Bridge Road. It contains ninety-six flats set over eight storeys. To Vauxhall Bridge Road the elevation is subdivided centrally by a projecting vertical lift shaft and its change in levels is marked by exposed floor plates. The horizontal projecting access galleries and regular pattern of projecting and recessed bays help to break down the elevations. To the garden side, its open projecting balconies, with set back glazing panels, dominate the facade.
View the listing here.
I’m looking for residents of Lillington Gardens to interview for this blog and forthcoming book, please get in touch if you would like to participate.





1 Bedroom flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£425,000(£7,944 per square metre)
A one bedroom flat in Henry Wise House, Lillington Gardens designed in 1969–74 by Darbourne and Darke for the City of Westminster. Henry Wise House is the largest building from ‘phase one’ of the scheme which fronts Vauxhall Bridge Road. It contains ninety-six flats set over eight storeys. To Vauxhall Bridge Road the elevation is subdivided centrally by a projecting vertical lift shaft and its change in levels is marked by exposed floor plates. The horizontal projecting access galleries and regular pattern of projecting and recessed bays help to break down the elevations. To the garden side, its open projecting balconies, with set back glazing panels, dominate the facade.
View the listing here.
I’m looking for residents of Lillington Gardens to interview for this blog and forthcoming book, please get in touch if you would like to participate.





1 Bedroom flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£425,000(£7,944 per square metre)
A one bedroom flat in Henry Wise House, Lillington Gardens designed in 1969–74 by Darbourne and Darke for the City of Westminster. Henry Wise House is the largest building from ‘phase one’ of the scheme which fronts Vauxhall Bridge Road. It contains ninety-six flats set over eight storeys. To Vauxhall Bridge Road the elevation is subdivided centrally by a projecting vertical lift shaft and its change in levels is marked by exposed floor plates. The horizontal projecting access galleries and regular pattern of projecting and recessed bays help to break down the elevations. To the garden side, its open projecting balconies, with set back glazing panels, dominate the facade.
View the listing here.
I’m looking for residents of Lillington Gardens to interview for this blog and forthcoming book, please get in touch if you would like to participate.





1 Bedroom flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£425,000(£7,944 per square metre)
A one bedroom flat in Henry Wise House, Lillington Gardens designed in 1969–74 by Darbourne and Darke for the City of Westminster. Henry Wise House is the largest building from ‘phase one’ of the scheme which fronts Vauxhall Bridge Road. It contains ninety-six flats set over eight storeys. To Vauxhall Bridge Road the elevation is subdivided centrally by a projecting vertical lift shaft and its change in levels is marked by exposed floor plates. The horizontal projecting access galleries and regular pattern of projecting and recessed bays help to break down the elevations. To the garden side, its open projecting balconies, with set back glazing panels, dominate the facade.
View the listing here.
I’m looking for residents of Lillington Gardens to interview for this blog and forthcoming book, please get in touch if you would like to participate.

1 Bedroom flat
Lillington Gardens
London SW1
£425,000
(£7,944 per square metre)

A one bedroom flat in Henry Wise House, Lillington Gardens designed in 1969–74 by Darbourne and Darke for the City of Westminster. Henry Wise House is the largest building from ‘phase one’ of the scheme which fronts Vauxhall Bridge Road. It contains ninety-six flats set over eight storeys. To Vauxhall Bridge Road the elevation is subdivided centrally by a projecting vertical lift shaft and its change in levels is marked by exposed floor plates. The horizontal projecting access galleries and regular pattern of projecting and recessed bays help to break down the elevations. To the garden side, its open projecting balconies, with set back glazing panels, dominate the facade.

View the listing here.

I’m looking for residents of Lillington Gardens to interview for this blog and forthcoming book, please get in touch if you would like to participate.

photo
1 Bedroom flat Shepherds Hill  London N6 £400,000(£7,353 per square metre)
There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flat Shepherds Hill  London N6 £400,000(£7,353 per square metre)
There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flat Shepherds Hill  London N6 £400,000(£7,353 per square metre)
There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.
View the listing here.

1 Bedroom flat
Shepherds Hill
London N6
£400,000
(£7,353 per square metre)

There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.

View the listing here.

photo
4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here.

4 Bedroom House
Clare Drive 
Edgbaston
Birmingham
£450,000
(£2680 per square metre)

Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.

John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 

For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here.