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Modernist Estates

Listing modernist homes for sale, focussing on London post-war estates, plus findings on the way, including books, interviews, films and upcoming events. I also do this: thingsyoucanbuy.co.uk
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Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here. Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here. Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here. Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here.

Barbican Type 76 flats

Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.

The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.

In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.

In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.

The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 

Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).

Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. 
Editioned screenprint by me available here.

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2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Keeling House
Claredale Street
London E2
£404 per week

Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.

The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.

View the listing here.

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3 Bedroom HouseThe HyndewoodForest HillLondon SE23£550,000
I featured a house in The Hyndewood just a few weeks ago. Well here’s a really nice example of another.
 The Hyndewood Estate, a 1960s development designed by architect Norman Starrett a young architect who had worked for Maxwell Fry. 'Hyndewood' were in fact the developers, and Starrett worked on other schemes with them—in particular Greatwood in Chislehurst which consists of 19 houses and won a Civic Trust in the 1960s.
This particular house is arranged over three floors, I’m not sure if the layout is original as it seems a little odd. There’s a kitchen with a ‘studio’ on the ground floor (perhaps a dining room previously), a conservatory and a garden at the back. Upstairs there’s a large living room and a bedroom, with two fourth bedrooms and the bathroom on the top floor.
View the listing here.  3 Bedroom HouseThe HyndewoodForest HillLondon SE23£550,000
I featured a house in The Hyndewood just a few weeks ago. Well here’s a really nice example of another.
 The Hyndewood Estate, a 1960s development designed by architect Norman Starrett a young architect who had worked for Maxwell Fry. 'Hyndewood' were in fact the developers, and Starrett worked on other schemes with them—in particular Greatwood in Chislehurst which consists of 19 houses and won a Civic Trust in the 1960s.
This particular house is arranged over three floors, I’m not sure if the layout is original as it seems a little odd. There’s a kitchen with a ‘studio’ on the ground floor (perhaps a dining room previously), a conservatory and a garden at the back. Upstairs there’s a large living room and a bedroom, with two fourth bedrooms and the bathroom on the top floor.
View the listing here.  3 Bedroom HouseThe HyndewoodForest HillLondon SE23£550,000
I featured a house in The Hyndewood just a few weeks ago. Well here’s a really nice example of another.
 The Hyndewood Estate, a 1960s development designed by architect Norman Starrett a young architect who had worked for Maxwell Fry. 'Hyndewood' were in fact the developers, and Starrett worked on other schemes with them—in particular Greatwood in Chislehurst which consists of 19 houses and won a Civic Trust in the 1960s.
This particular house is arranged over three floors, I’m not sure if the layout is original as it seems a little odd. There’s a kitchen with a ‘studio’ on the ground floor (perhaps a dining room previously), a conservatory and a garden at the back. Upstairs there’s a large living room and a bedroom, with two fourth bedrooms and the bathroom on the top floor.
View the listing here.  3 Bedroom HouseThe HyndewoodForest HillLondon SE23£550,000
I featured a house in The Hyndewood just a few weeks ago. Well here’s a really nice example of another.
 The Hyndewood Estate, a 1960s development designed by architect Norman Starrett a young architect who had worked for Maxwell Fry. 'Hyndewood' were in fact the developers, and Starrett worked on other schemes with them—in particular Greatwood in Chislehurst which consists of 19 houses and won a Civic Trust in the 1960s.
This particular house is arranged over three floors, I’m not sure if the layout is original as it seems a little odd. There’s a kitchen with a ‘studio’ on the ground floor (perhaps a dining room previously), a conservatory and a garden at the back. Upstairs there’s a large living room and a bedroom, with two fourth bedrooms and the bathroom on the top floor.
View the listing here.  3 Bedroom HouseThe HyndewoodForest HillLondon SE23£550,000
I featured a house in The Hyndewood just a few weeks ago. Well here’s a really nice example of another.
 The Hyndewood Estate, a 1960s development designed by architect Norman Starrett a young architect who had worked for Maxwell Fry. 'Hyndewood' were in fact the developers, and Starrett worked on other schemes with them—in particular Greatwood in Chislehurst which consists of 19 houses and won a Civic Trust in the 1960s.
This particular house is arranged over three floors, I’m not sure if the layout is original as it seems a little odd. There’s a kitchen with a ‘studio’ on the ground floor (perhaps a dining room previously), a conservatory and a garden at the back. Upstairs there’s a large living room and a bedroom, with two fourth bedrooms and the bathroom on the top floor.
View the listing here.  3 Bedroom HouseThe HyndewoodForest HillLondon SE23£550,000
I featured a house in The Hyndewood just a few weeks ago. Well here’s a really nice example of another.
 The Hyndewood Estate, a 1960s development designed by architect Norman Starrett a young architect who had worked for Maxwell Fry. 'Hyndewood' were in fact the developers, and Starrett worked on other schemes with them—in particular Greatwood in Chislehurst which consists of 19 houses and won a Civic Trust in the 1960s.
This particular house is arranged over three floors, I’m not sure if the layout is original as it seems a little odd. There’s a kitchen with a ‘studio’ on the ground floor (perhaps a dining room previously), a conservatory and a garden at the back. Upstairs there’s a large living room and a bedroom, with two fourth bedrooms and the bathroom on the top floor.
View the listing here. 

3 Bedroom House
The Hyndewood
Forest Hill
London SE23
£550,000

I featured a house in The Hyndewood just a few weeks ago. Well here’s a really nice example of another.

 The Hyndewood Estate, a 1960s development designed by architect Norman Starrett a young architect who had worked for Maxwell Fry. 'Hyndewood' were in fact the developers, and Starrett worked on other schemes with them—in particular Greatwood in Chislehurst which consists of 19 houses and won a Civic Trust in the 1960s.

This particular house is arranged over three floors, I’m not sure if the layout is original as it seems a little odd. There’s a kitchen with a ‘studio’ on the ground floor (perhaps a dining room previously), a conservatory and a garden at the back. Upstairs there’s a large living room and a bedroom, with two fourth bedrooms and the bathroom on the top floor.

View the listing here

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Studio flatCentre HeightsFinchley RoadLondon NW3£360,000
A ‘very spacious studio apartment located on the eighth floor’, what are they talking about, it looks tiny! Anyway, there’s not much to like about the interior of this flat, but I wanted to feature it because of the building. It was designed by Douglas Stephen (1923–1991) who was working with Panos Koulermos at the time. Built in 1961 in concrete and glass, it contains a mix of flats, office and shops. Pevsner notes this as an ‘early example of the concrete idiom of the 1960s’. It has a conspicuous stair-tower and flats, recessed in a concrete grid so that the projecting balconies are flush with the outside.View the listing here. Studio flatCentre HeightsFinchley RoadLondon NW3£360,000
A ‘very spacious studio apartment located on the eighth floor’, what are they talking about, it looks tiny! Anyway, there’s not much to like about the interior of this flat, but I wanted to feature it because of the building. It was designed by Douglas Stephen (1923–1991) who was working with Panos Koulermos at the time. Built in 1961 in concrete and glass, it contains a mix of flats, office and shops. Pevsner notes this as an ‘early example of the concrete idiom of the 1960s’. It has a conspicuous stair-tower and flats, recessed in a concrete grid so that the projecting balconies are flush with the outside.View the listing here. Studio flatCentre HeightsFinchley RoadLondon NW3£360,000
A ‘very spacious studio apartment located on the eighth floor’, what are they talking about, it looks tiny! Anyway, there’s not much to like about the interior of this flat, but I wanted to feature it because of the building. It was designed by Douglas Stephen (1923–1991) who was working with Panos Koulermos at the time. Built in 1961 in concrete and glass, it contains a mix of flats, office and shops. Pevsner notes this as an ‘early example of the concrete idiom of the 1960s’. It has a conspicuous stair-tower and flats, recessed in a concrete grid so that the projecting balconies are flush with the outside.View the listing here. Studio flatCentre HeightsFinchley RoadLondon NW3£360,000
A ‘very spacious studio apartment located on the eighth floor’, what are they talking about, it looks tiny! Anyway, there’s not much to like about the interior of this flat, but I wanted to feature it because of the building. It was designed by Douglas Stephen (1923–1991) who was working with Panos Koulermos at the time. Built in 1961 in concrete and glass, it contains a mix of flats, office and shops. Pevsner notes this as an ‘early example of the concrete idiom of the 1960s’. It has a conspicuous stair-tower and flats, recessed in a concrete grid so that the projecting balconies are flush with the outside.View the listing here. Studio flatCentre HeightsFinchley RoadLondon NW3£360,000
A ‘very spacious studio apartment located on the eighth floor’, what are they talking about, it looks tiny! Anyway, there’s not much to like about the interior of this flat, but I wanted to feature it because of the building. It was designed by Douglas Stephen (1923–1991) who was working with Panos Koulermos at the time. Built in 1961 in concrete and glass, it contains a mix of flats, office and shops. Pevsner notes this as an ‘early example of the concrete idiom of the 1960s’. It has a conspicuous stair-tower and flats, recessed in a concrete grid so that the projecting balconies are flush with the outside.View the listing here.

Studio flat
Centre Heights
Finchley Road
London NW3
£360,000

A ‘very spacious studio apartment located on the eighth floor’, what are they talking about, it looks tiny! Anyway, there’s not much to like about the interior of this flat, but I wanted to feature it because of the building. 

It was designed by Douglas Stephen (1923–1991) who was working with Panos Koulermos at the time. Built in 1961 in concrete and glass, it contains a mix of flats, office and shops. Pevsner notes this as an ‘early example of the concrete idiom of the 1960s’. It has a conspicuous stair-tower and flats, recessed in a concrete grid so that the projecting balconies are flush with the outside.

View the listing here.

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1 Bedroom flatHallfield EstateLondon W2£350,000(£7,292 per square metre)
Here’s a  more reasonably priced one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate than the last one I featured, albeit needing some work.
View the listing here with the added ‘bonus’ of an audio guide. 1 Bedroom flatHallfield EstateLondon W2£350,000(£7,292 per square metre)
Here’s a  more reasonably priced one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate than the last one I featured, albeit needing some work.
View the listing here with the added ‘bonus’ of an audio guide. 1 Bedroom flatHallfield EstateLondon W2£350,000(£7,292 per square metre)
Here’s a  more reasonably priced one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate than the last one I featured, albeit needing some work.
View the listing here with the added ‘bonus’ of an audio guide. 1 Bedroom flatHallfield EstateLondon W2£350,000(£7,292 per square metre)
Here’s a  more reasonably priced one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate than the last one I featured, albeit needing some work.
View the listing here with the added ‘bonus’ of an audio guide.

1 Bedroom flat
Hallfield Estate
London W2
£350,000
(£7,292 per square metre)

Here’s a  more reasonably priced one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate than the last one I featured, albeit needing some work.

View the listing here with the added ‘bonus’ of an audio guide.

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2 Bedroom flat O’donnell Court Brunswick CentreLondon WC1£570 a week There’s a few flat currently to rent in the Brunswick Centre at the moment.   This is the cheapest with the others being £770 a week for exactly the same size flat. The Brunswick Centre was originally designed as private housing, but mid way through the scheme, the developers run out of money and it was taken over by Camden Council. It is only two thirds of the original scheme designed by Sir Leslie Martin and Patrick Hodgkinson for the replanning of the area. It’s ziggurat shape, overpowering entrance and visually exciting appearance are in some ways reminiscent of the Futurists. The estate includes, flats, shops, car parking, and my favourite cinema, the Renoir. View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat O’donnell Court Brunswick CentreLondon WC1£570 a week There’s a few flat currently to rent in the Brunswick Centre at the moment.   This is the cheapest with the others being £770 a week for exactly the same size flat. The Brunswick Centre was originally designed as private housing, but mid way through the scheme, the developers run out of money and it was taken over by Camden Council. It is only two thirds of the original scheme designed by Sir Leslie Martin and Patrick Hodgkinson for the replanning of the area. It’s ziggurat shape, overpowering entrance and visually exciting appearance are in some ways reminiscent of the Futurists. The estate includes, flats, shops, car parking, and my favourite cinema, the Renoir. View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat O’donnell Court Brunswick CentreLondon WC1£570 a week There’s a few flat currently to rent in the Brunswick Centre at the moment.   This is the cheapest with the others being £770 a week for exactly the same size flat. The Brunswick Centre was originally designed as private housing, but mid way through the scheme, the developers run out of money and it was taken over by Camden Council. It is only two thirds of the original scheme designed by Sir Leslie Martin and Patrick Hodgkinson for the replanning of the area. It’s ziggurat shape, overpowering entrance and visually exciting appearance are in some ways reminiscent of the Futurists. The estate includes, flats, shops, car parking, and my favourite cinema, the Renoir. View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat O’donnell Court Brunswick CentreLondon WC1£570 a week There’s a few flat currently to rent in the Brunswick Centre at the moment.   This is the cheapest with the others being £770 a week for exactly the same size flat. The Brunswick Centre was originally designed as private housing, but mid way through the scheme, the developers run out of money and it was taken over by Camden Council. It is only two thirds of the original scheme designed by Sir Leslie Martin and Patrick Hodgkinson for the replanning of the area. It’s ziggurat shape, overpowering entrance and visually exciting appearance are in some ways reminiscent of the Futurists. The estate includes, flats, shops, car parking, and my favourite cinema, the Renoir. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat 
O’donnell Court 
Brunswick Centre
London WC1
£570 a week 

There’s a few flat currently to rent in the Brunswick Centre at the moment.   This is the cheapest with the others being £770 a week for exactly the same size flat. 

The Brunswick Centre was originally designed as private housing, but mid way through the scheme, the developers run out of money and it was taken over by Camden Council. It is only two thirds of the original scheme designed by Sir Leslie Martin and Patrick Hodgkinson for the replanning of the area. It’s ziggurat shape, overpowering entrance and visually exciting appearance are in some ways reminiscent of the Futurists. The estate includes, flats, shops, car parking, and my favourite cinema, the Renoir. 

View the listing here.

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3 Bedroom houseCombe AvenueVanbrugh Park EstateLondon SE3£550,000Chamberlin Powell and Bon were commissioned in 1958 to develop the Vanbrugh Park Estate, a site of seven acres. Made up of mixed level blocks, similar to their scheme the Golden Lane Estate, mostly consisting two-storey terraces of houses and mews flats, over garaging, built of concrete block. There’s also an eight storey tower of 64 flats, with a large central lobby and a sculptural lift shaft of pick-hammered concrete contrasting with large areas of glazing.
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom houseCombe AvenueVanbrugh Park EstateLondon SE3£550,000Chamberlin Powell and Bon were commissioned in 1958 to develop the Vanbrugh Park Estate, a site of seven acres. Made up of mixed level blocks, similar to their scheme the Golden Lane Estate, mostly consisting two-storey terraces of houses and mews flats, over garaging, built of concrete block. There’s also an eight storey tower of 64 flats, with a large central lobby and a sculptural lift shaft of pick-hammered concrete contrasting with large areas of glazing.
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom houseCombe AvenueVanbrugh Park EstateLondon SE3£550,000Chamberlin Powell and Bon were commissioned in 1958 to develop the Vanbrugh Park Estate, a site of seven acres. Made up of mixed level blocks, similar to their scheme the Golden Lane Estate, mostly consisting two-storey terraces of houses and mews flats, over garaging, built of concrete block. There’s also an eight storey tower of 64 flats, with a large central lobby and a sculptural lift shaft of pick-hammered concrete contrasting with large areas of glazing.
View the listing here.

3 Bedroom house
Combe Avenue
Vanbrugh Park Estate
London SE3

£550,000

Chamberlin Powell and Bon were commissioned in 1958 to develop the Vanbrugh Park Estate, a site of seven acres. Made up of mixed level blocks, similar to their scheme the Golden Lane Estate, mostly consisting two-storey terraces of houses and mews flats, over garaging, built of concrete block. There’s also an eight storey tower of 64 flats, with a large central lobby and a sculptural lift shaft of pick-hammered concrete contrasting with large areas of glazing.

View the listing here.

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2 Bedroom housePennethorne CloseLondon E9£700,000
I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom housePennethorne CloseLondon E9£700,000
I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom housePennethorne CloseLondon E9£700,000
I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom housePennethorne CloseLondon E9£700,000
I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom housePennethorne CloseLondon E9£700,000
I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom housePennethorne CloseLondon E9£700,000
I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom housePennethorne CloseLondon E9£700,000
I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom house
Pennethorne Close
London E9
£700,000

I featured one of these houses only a couple of weeks. The £675,000 they were asking for it seemed optimistic at best. But what do I know, apparently it had multiple offers and went to sealed bids. So perhaps £700,000 for this one isn’t as crazy as it sounds?! 

View the listing here.

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Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

Westfield, Ashtead Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

The Cedars, Teddington Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

Cedar Chase, Taplow Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

Castle Green, Weybridge Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

Weymede, Byfleet Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

Templemere, Weybridge Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

Parkleys, Richmond Span Houses
There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 
Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.
3 Bedroom HouseWestfield, Ashtead£425,000Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom houseThe Cedars, Teddington£629,95019 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCedar ChaseTaplow, Maidenhead£475,000Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseCastle Green, Weybridge£550,000One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseWeymede, Byfleet£330,000Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom houseTemplemereWeybridge£475,000Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flatParkleysRichmond£355,000Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.
In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.


2 Bedroom flatHighsett Cambridge£375,000Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

Highsett, Cambridge

Span Houses

There’s a stack of Span houses on the market at the moment, so I thought I would do a group listing. 

Span was the vision of the architect Eric Lyons. His aim was to provide a new style of private estate development, ‘affordable, well-designed homes in landscape settings, which would foster a village community atmosphere’.

3 Bedroom House
Westfield, Ashtead
£425,000

Built in 1967, it comprises 40 houses set within mature secluded grounds in Ashtead, Surrey. The estate was awarded a Highly Commended Housing Award by The Ministry of Housing and Local Government. 
Needs a bit of work, but retains a lot of original features. Listing here.

3 Bedroom house
The Cedars, Teddington
£629,950
19 houses built in 1957–58. All type T2s with samll front gardens around a small communal garden and car parking. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom house
Cedar Chase
Taplow, Maidenhead
£475,000
Originally receiving a Housing Design Award on its completion in 1966, the Cedar Chase design is simultaneously open yet private. Each house (24 houses in total, Type C30) is an L-shape in plan, with ground-floor living and first-floor bedroom accommodation enclosing a small courtyard. Although the private garden of each house varies in size, this layout of house and immediate outdoor space is one of the keys to the design – the courtyard becoming an extra “room” for much of the year and providing shelter from autumn winds and winter frosts. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom house
Castle Green, Weybridge
£550,000
One of five Span Estates in Weybridge, Castle Green comprises of 22 houses Type TB2, built in 1962–65 it received a housing award. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom house
Weymede, Byfleet
£330,000
Weymede is an estate of 141 houses built between 196366 on the border where Byfleet morphs into Weybridge and set in 15 acres of private, fully enclosed landscaped garden featuring a wide variety of mature trees and shrubs. View the listing here.

3 Bedroom house
Templemere
Weybridge
£475,000
Templemere is a secluded private development of 65 town houses in 12 acres of landscaped gardens in Oatlands Village, mid-way between Walton-on-Thames and Weybridge in Surrey. Built in 1963 by Span Developments, the estate won a coveted Civic Trust award the following year for ‘making an outstanding contribution to the local scene’. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Parkleys
Richmond
£355,000
Parkleys compromises of a series of two storey and three storey H - plan blocks of flats and a parade of shops. It was built using brick ‘cross-wall’ construction and ‘Thermalite’ insulation blocks. Internally a standard structural bay accommodates one of the three (A,B or C) room combinations.

In 1958 Eric Lyons discussed the use of space at Parkleys,‘My particular interest was the formation of the courtyard which I thought was a neglected form of living environment. The courtyard is not a dead space. It is actually circulation. All access for trades and services is on the perimeter and the courtyards are used for pedestrian access only.’ Parkleys was listed Grade II in December 1998. View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Highsett 
Cambridge
£375,000
Gread II listed estate comprising of 37 flats, Tye A, B and C. Highsett 1, 2 and 3 are the only schemes by Span to be included in the RIBA Guide to Modern British Architecture  since 1945. View the listing here.

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1 Bedroom flatTaunton HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£475,000(£10,556 per square metre)
The price of this small one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate is mind boggling. A typo surely?! 
Those of you not familiar with the estate here’s a bit of history:
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate.  The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flatTaunton HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£475,000(£10,556 per square metre)
The price of this small one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate is mind boggling. A typo surely?! 
Those of you not familiar with the estate here’s a bit of history:
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate.  The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flatTaunton HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£475,000(£10,556 per square metre)
The price of this small one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate is mind boggling. A typo surely?! 
Those of you not familiar with the estate here’s a bit of history:
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate.  The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flatTaunton HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£475,000(£10,556 per square metre)
The price of this small one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate is mind boggling. A typo surely?! 
Those of you not familiar with the estate here’s a bit of history:
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate.  The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flatTaunton HouseHallfield EstateLondon W2£475,000(£10,556 per square metre)
The price of this small one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate is mind boggling. A typo surely?! 
Those of you not familiar with the estate here’s a bit of history:
Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.
The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate.  The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.
View the listing here.

1 Bedroom flat
Taunton House
Hallfield Estate
London W2
£475,000
(£10,556 per square metre)

The price of this small one bedroom flat on the Hallfield Estate is mind boggling. A typo surely?! 

Those of you not familiar with the estate here’s a bit of history:

Following the second world war, Paddington underwent a series of rehabilitation and renewal programmes. The decision to redevelop the partially bombed site between Gloucester Terrace and Inverness Terrace was taken by the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington in 1947.

The Borough invited several architects to prepare designs for a new estate, initially called Bishops Bridge Road Housing Estate.  The original design for the estate was conceived by Tecton but then executed after the firm split up by two of its members, Lyndsay Drake and Sir Denys Lasdun.

View the listing here.

photo
Help stop proposed building plans for ‘Eyecatcher’ restaurant at the Brunswick Centre

The Renoir Cinema has long been my favourite cinema. Way before the shiny new Brunswick Shopping Centre with its Waitrose and Carluccio moved in, you would find me on my own on a Sunday afternoon catching whatever was being shown. 
The single storey cinema sits proudly underneath the huge concrete columns of the Grade II listed Brunswick (designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the late 60s and early 70s). Some bright spark however has seen this as a waste of space and a commercial opportunity — the owners of Brunswick have submitted a truly terrible planning proposal for a restaurant, the ‘Eyecatcher’ (cough cough) to be inserted between the Renoir and the flats above (see pictures). 
The proposal would ruin the architecture and severely reduce access and public space — not to mention the disturbance it will cause to the flats right above it. We have to stop this from happening! The residents and friends of the Brunswick have started a petition to stop the plans going through, please, please help by signing it here. Help stop proposed building plans for ‘Eyecatcher’ restaurant at the Brunswick Centre

The Renoir Cinema has long been my favourite cinema. Way before the shiny new Brunswick Shopping Centre with its Waitrose and Carluccio moved in, you would find me on my own on a Sunday afternoon catching whatever was being shown. 
The single storey cinema sits proudly underneath the huge concrete columns of the Grade II listed Brunswick (designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the late 60s and early 70s). Some bright spark however has seen this as a waste of space and a commercial opportunity — the owners of Brunswick have submitted a truly terrible planning proposal for a restaurant, the ‘Eyecatcher’ (cough cough) to be inserted between the Renoir and the flats above (see pictures). 
The proposal would ruin the architecture and severely reduce access and public space — not to mention the disturbance it will cause to the flats right above it. We have to stop this from happening! The residents and friends of the Brunswick have started a petition to stop the plans going through, please, please help by signing it here. Help stop proposed building plans for ‘Eyecatcher’ restaurant at the Brunswick Centre

The Renoir Cinema has long been my favourite cinema. Way before the shiny new Brunswick Shopping Centre with its Waitrose and Carluccio moved in, you would find me on my own on a Sunday afternoon catching whatever was being shown. 
The single storey cinema sits proudly underneath the huge concrete columns of the Grade II listed Brunswick (designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the late 60s and early 70s). Some bright spark however has seen this as a waste of space and a commercial opportunity — the owners of Brunswick have submitted a truly terrible planning proposal for a restaurant, the ‘Eyecatcher’ (cough cough) to be inserted between the Renoir and the flats above (see pictures). 
The proposal would ruin the architecture and severely reduce access and public space — not to mention the disturbance it will cause to the flats right above it. We have to stop this from happening! The residents and friends of the Brunswick have started a petition to stop the plans going through, please, please help by signing it here. Help stop proposed building plans for ‘Eyecatcher’ restaurant at the Brunswick Centre

The Renoir Cinema has long been my favourite cinema. Way before the shiny new Brunswick Shopping Centre with its Waitrose and Carluccio moved in, you would find me on my own on a Sunday afternoon catching whatever was being shown. 
The single storey cinema sits proudly underneath the huge concrete columns of the Grade II listed Brunswick (designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the late 60s and early 70s). Some bright spark however has seen this as a waste of space and a commercial opportunity — the owners of Brunswick have submitted a truly terrible planning proposal for a restaurant, the ‘Eyecatcher’ (cough cough) to be inserted between the Renoir and the flats above (see pictures). 
The proposal would ruin the architecture and severely reduce access and public space — not to mention the disturbance it will cause to the flats right above it. We have to stop this from happening! The residents and friends of the Brunswick have started a petition to stop the plans going through, please, please help by signing it here. Help stop proposed building plans for ‘Eyecatcher’ restaurant at the Brunswick Centre

The Renoir Cinema has long been my favourite cinema. Way before the shiny new Brunswick Shopping Centre with its Waitrose and Carluccio moved in, you would find me on my own on a Sunday afternoon catching whatever was being shown. 
The single storey cinema sits proudly underneath the huge concrete columns of the Grade II listed Brunswick (designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the late 60s and early 70s). Some bright spark however has seen this as a waste of space and a commercial opportunity — the owners of Brunswick have submitted a truly terrible planning proposal for a restaurant, the ‘Eyecatcher’ (cough cough) to be inserted between the Renoir and the flats above (see pictures). 
The proposal would ruin the architecture and severely reduce access and public space — not to mention the disturbance it will cause to the flats right above it. We have to stop this from happening! The residents and friends of the Brunswick have started a petition to stop the plans going through, please, please help by signing it here. Help stop proposed building plans for ‘Eyecatcher’ restaurant at the Brunswick Centre

The Renoir Cinema has long been my favourite cinema. Way before the shiny new Brunswick Shopping Centre with its Waitrose and Carluccio moved in, you would find me on my own on a Sunday afternoon catching whatever was being shown. 
The single storey cinema sits proudly underneath the huge concrete columns of the Grade II listed Brunswick (designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the late 60s and early 70s). Some bright spark however has seen this as a waste of space and a commercial opportunity — the owners of Brunswick have submitted a truly terrible planning proposal for a restaurant, the ‘Eyecatcher’ (cough cough) to be inserted between the Renoir and the flats above (see pictures). 
The proposal would ruin the architecture and severely reduce access and public space — not to mention the disturbance it will cause to the flats right above it. We have to stop this from happening! The residents and friends of the Brunswick have started a petition to stop the plans going through, please, please help by signing it here.

Help stop proposed building plans for
Eyecatcher
 restaurant at the Brunswick Centre

The Renoir Cinema has long been my favourite cinema. Way before the shiny new Brunswick Shopping Centre with its Waitrose and Carluccio moved in, you would find me on my own on a Sunday afternoon catching whatever was being shown. 

The single storey cinema sits proudly underneath the huge concrete columns of the Grade II listed Brunswick (designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the late 60s and early 70s). Some bright spark however has seen this as a waste of space and a commercial opportunity — the owners of Brunswick have submitted a truly terrible planning proposal for a restaurant, the ‘Eyecatcher’ (cough cough) to be inserted between the Renoir and the flats above (see pictures). 

The proposal would ruin the architecture and severely reduce access and public space — not to mention the disturbance it will cause to the flats right above it. We have to stop this from happening! The residents and friends of the Brunswick have started a petition to stop the plans going through, please, please help by signing it here.

photo
West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun.  West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun.  West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun.  West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun.  West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun.  West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun.  West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun.  West Oak, Beckenham
After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 
Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun. 

West Oak, Beckenham

After Apex Close, I continued my journey to try and find a lesser known Span Estate ‘West Oak’. At the end of The Avenue, the tarmacked road turns into a pit-holed-gravelled-car-hazard—presumably the boundary as to when the road becomes private. A 5 minute walk later and there was the sign ‘PRIVATE ESTATE’ deterring me to step any further. 

Surprisingly, I don’t think I’ve actually seen a Span estate in the flesh before. I hope Eric was just having an off day here, as there was nothing that was particularly noteworthy. The houses were pleasant enough, although I didn’t see any that retained their original glazing, with more plastic than a children’s toy box. For my liking it was just a bit too reminiscent of somewhere your Nanna might have lived. The estate consists of 21 houses (of type T8 and T7) and 12 flats built on a sloping site. To the rear of the estate were the communal grounds, which were dotted with picnic tables and a canoodling couple basking in the sun. 

photo
A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… The last remaining original window and door. A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… The smaller block. A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… A trip to Beckenham, South LondonApex Close
A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.
The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.
It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.
So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.
Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.
The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 
The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.
The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 
Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 
At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 
More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do… The only original door left

A trip to Beckenham, South London
Apex Close

A friend and perpetual house hunter sent me a Rightmove link to a rather bland looking flat this week. Also attached were some RIBA black and white images of the exterior. Which were far from bland, it was odd, very odd. So it got me curious, and with further research I found out that what I was looking at was a scheme of duplexes designed by Derek Sharp Associates.

The Apex Close Housing Trust was set up by Derek Sharp Associates in 1966, and the building of Apex Close took place between 1966 and 1967.

It’s bold modern forms where somewhat alien in Beckenham at the time, and there was much public opposition when planning was first proposed. Nonetheless, it received a ‘1968 Architectural Design Project Award’ and some national press coverage. Apex Close is now also ‘locally listed’ by Bromley Council, as it’s unique design is of important historical interest to the Borough.

So with an open mind about living in Beckenham, well partly ajar anyway, I took to the train to Beckenham Junction to meet an estate agent called Sam.

Apex Close runs off The Avenue, a street that is not short of 1960s houses and blocks of flats. Two identical sculptural blocks run the length of the ‘close’, with projecting staircase ramps that take you to the flats on the upper level.

The lower flats are reached at ground level, each flat having it’s own entrance, with large picture windows and doors at the back which take you out onto a small terrace and communal grounds. In fact all but one of the flats had replaced their original glazing with UPVC sliding patio doors. 

The back of the flats reminded me of the below podium flats in the Barbican, particularly the Andrewes House ones which have their own gardens.

The upper level flats (the one I viewed), have an open plan kitchen and living room, with a door onto a small private balcony, with two bedrooms and the bathroom upstairs. I can’t even be bothered to tell you how soulless the interior was, lets just say the agent’s opening lines were, “The great thing about this flat is that it’s been modernised and refurbished throughout”. I whizzed around it in one minute and politely made my way out to continue taking pictures of the exterior. 

Judging by the replacement doors and windows, I think there was definitely a lack of like minded people living there. 

At the end of the cul-de-sac, on the left, was another smaller squarer block, in the same buff brick. I wondered about here too, I must say the communal areas were immaculately maintained. I walked up a set communal stairs, and overheard a conversation in one of the flats about ripping out built in wardrobes. I left with a heavy heart. 

More on other modern houses and flats in Beckenham later, but I must go and train for a half marathon now. As you do…

photo
2 Bedroom flatPennethorne CloseLondon E9£675,000(£6,3981 per square metre)
This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatPennethorne CloseLondon E9£675,000(£6,3981 per square metre)
This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatPennethorne CloseLondon E9£675,000(£6,3981 per square metre)
This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatPennethorne CloseLondon E9£675,000(£6,3981 per square metre)
This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatPennethorne CloseLondon E9£675,000(£6,3981 per square metre)
This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatPennethorne CloseLondon E9£675,000(£6,3981 per square metre)
This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatPennethorne CloseLondon E9£675,000(£6,3981 per square metre)
This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Pennethorne Close
London E9
£675,000
(£6,3981 per square metre)

This two bedroom duplex on the Crown Estate (described as New York style?!) with an eye-watering asking price is similar to Kirsty and Arvid’s home we featured a few weeks ago. The layout is a bit different, with a large living space on the ground floor, and everything else upstairs. I think it’s also fair to says it going to need quite a lot of work.

View the listing here.