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Modernist Estates

Listing modernist homes for sale, focussing on London post-war estates, plus findings on the way, including books, interviews, films and upcoming events. I also do this: thingsyoucanbuy.co.uk
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1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year.

1 Bedroom flat
Lulot Gardens
Whittington Estate
London N19
£425,000
(£8891 per square metre)

Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.

On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.

View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year.

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2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
O’Donnel Court
Brunwick Centre
London WC1
£900,000
(£13,091 per square metre)

My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 

If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.

View the listing here.

video

Doreen

Doreen has lived in a high rise on Elephant and Castle’s Heygate Estate since it was built in the early 70s. Just 30-years later the estate is up for re-development. Doreen reminisces about the culture of the estate when it was in it’s prime, and what went wrong.

Film by David Reeve and Patrick Steel.

(Source: youtube.com)

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Front Row, BBC Radio 4
Aylesbury and Heygate

The Aylesbury and Heygate estates in South London have served as the backdrop for countless films and TV dramas over the years, including Spooks, The Bill and Harry Brown. But now residents have had enough and all filming has been banned. John visited the estates to find out more.

Originally broadcast February 2012

(Source: youtube.com)

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Nairn Across Britain
From London to Lancashire

First transmitted in 1972, Ian Nairn takes a journey to the industrial North and finds plenty to comment about in a landscape of surprises.

(Source: youtube.com)

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Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here.

Studio flat
World’s End Estate
London SW10
£450,000

A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 

Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.

View the listing here.

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2 Bedroom flat65 Ladbroke GroveLondon W11£895,000
A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat65 Ladbroke GroveLondon W11£895,000
A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat65 Ladbroke GroveLondon W11£895,000
A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
65 Ladbroke Grove
London W11
£895,000

A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 

View the listing here.

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2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here

2 Bedroom flat
Emanuel House
South Croxted Road
London SE21
£360,000

I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.

Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 

I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.

The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here

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Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here.

Studio flat
Lillington Gardens
London SW1
£360,000
(£9,772 per square metre)

You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 

More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.
View the listing here.

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Modernist homes under £250,000
Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 
Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here. Modernist homes under £250,000
Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 
Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here. Modernist homes under £250,000
Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 
Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here.

Modernist homes under £250,000

Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 

Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here.

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Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva Tyler
Pullman Court
London SW2

This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.

Tell us a bit about yourself and where you live
I’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 

How long have you lived here?
28 years.

Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?
I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?
No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.

How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?
The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.

What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?
Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.

What are the neighbours like?
An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.

Best things about living here?
My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.

Worst thing about living here?
The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.

Finally, money no object, where would you live?
Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

photo
2 Bedroom flat for rentMedinaEindhoven€1750 a month
I’m going to meet Neave Brown on Friday. I’m ridiculously nervous about it. I’m not sure if my usual ‘I’ve brought you some cake’ as an ice breaker is going to work. Or maybe it will? Anyway, I am trying to cram in as much research as my ‘oh my God, but I’m not an architect, I’ve no idea what you’re talking about’ brain can squeeze into it.
So, after Alexandra Road Estate was completed Neave Brown mainly worked on projects outside of the UK. Including his last project, the Medina complex in Eindhoven, which was completed in 2003. 
The master plan for the Smalle Haven area designed by Jo Coenen and Neave Brown was commissioned to design a high-density low-rise residential structure at the foot of Coenen’s ‘Vesteda Tower’. The result is an oasis of green and quiet in a hectic city; with two very distinct sides. 
One side of the 8 storey building faces the busy Vestdijk and is also home to commercial space at its base, the other side is lower, quiet and more like a residential street. There’s a total of 73 apartments, 250 parking spaces and 2000 square metre of commercial space. 
Up for rent is this two bedroom duplex with large roof terrace
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat for rentMedinaEindhoven€1750 a month
I’m going to meet Neave Brown on Friday. I’m ridiculously nervous about it. I’m not sure if my usual ‘I’ve brought you some cake’ as an ice breaker is going to work. Or maybe it will? Anyway, I am trying to cram in as much research as my ‘oh my God, but I’m not an architect, I’ve no idea what you’re talking about’ brain can squeeze into it.
So, after Alexandra Road Estate was completed Neave Brown mainly worked on projects outside of the UK. Including his last project, the Medina complex in Eindhoven, which was completed in 2003. 
The master plan for the Smalle Haven area designed by Jo Coenen and Neave Brown was commissioned to design a high-density low-rise residential structure at the foot of Coenen’s ‘Vesteda Tower’. The result is an oasis of green and quiet in a hectic city; with two very distinct sides. 
One side of the 8 storey building faces the busy Vestdijk and is also home to commercial space at its base, the other side is lower, quiet and more like a residential street. There’s a total of 73 apartments, 250 parking spaces and 2000 square metre of commercial space. 
Up for rent is this two bedroom duplex with large roof terrace
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat for rentMedinaEindhoven€1750 a month
I’m going to meet Neave Brown on Friday. I’m ridiculously nervous about it. I’m not sure if my usual ‘I’ve brought you some cake’ as an ice breaker is going to work. Or maybe it will? Anyway, I am trying to cram in as much research as my ‘oh my God, but I’m not an architect, I’ve no idea what you’re talking about’ brain can squeeze into it.
So, after Alexandra Road Estate was completed Neave Brown mainly worked on projects outside of the UK. Including his last project, the Medina complex in Eindhoven, which was completed in 2003. 
The master plan for the Smalle Haven area designed by Jo Coenen and Neave Brown was commissioned to design a high-density low-rise residential structure at the foot of Coenen’s ‘Vesteda Tower’. The result is an oasis of green and quiet in a hectic city; with two very distinct sides. 
One side of the 8 storey building faces the busy Vestdijk and is also home to commercial space at its base, the other side is lower, quiet and more like a residential street. There’s a total of 73 apartments, 250 parking spaces and 2000 square metre of commercial space. 
Up for rent is this two bedroom duplex with large roof terrace
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat for rentMedinaEindhoven€1750 a month
I’m going to meet Neave Brown on Friday. I’m ridiculously nervous about it. I’m not sure if my usual ‘I’ve brought you some cake’ as an ice breaker is going to work. Or maybe it will? Anyway, I am trying to cram in as much research as my ‘oh my God, but I’m not an architect, I’ve no idea what you’re talking about’ brain can squeeze into it.
So, after Alexandra Road Estate was completed Neave Brown mainly worked on projects outside of the UK. Including his last project, the Medina complex in Eindhoven, which was completed in 2003. 
The master plan for the Smalle Haven area designed by Jo Coenen and Neave Brown was commissioned to design a high-density low-rise residential structure at the foot of Coenen’s ‘Vesteda Tower’. The result is an oasis of green and quiet in a hectic city; with two very distinct sides. 
One side of the 8 storey building faces the busy Vestdijk and is also home to commercial space at its base, the other side is lower, quiet and more like a residential street. There’s a total of 73 apartments, 250 parking spaces and 2000 square metre of commercial space. 
Up for rent is this two bedroom duplex with large roof terrace
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat for rent
Medina
Eindhoven
€1750 a month

I’m going to meet Neave Brown on Friday. I’m ridiculously nervous about it. I’m not sure if my usual ‘I’ve brought you some cake’ as an ice breaker is going to work. Or maybe it will? Anyway, I am trying to cram in as much research as my ‘oh my God, but I’m not an architect, I’ve no idea what you’re talking about’ brain can squeeze into it.

So, after Alexandra Road Estate was completed Neave Brown mainly worked on projects outside of the UK. Including his last project, the Medina complex in Eindhoven, which was completed in 2003. 

The master plan for the Smalle Haven area designed by Jo Coenen and Neave Brown was commissioned to design a high-density low-rise residential structure at the foot of Coenen’s ‘Vesteda Tower’. The result is an oasis of green and quiet in a hectic city; with two very distinct sides.

One side of the 8 storey building faces the busy Vestdijk and is also home to commercial space at its base, the other side is lower, quiet and more like a residential street. There’s a total of 73 apartments, 250 parking spaces and 2000 square metre of commercial space. 

Up for rent is this two bedroom duplex with large roof terrace

View the listing here.

photo
Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here. Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here. Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here. Barbican Type 76 flats
Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.
The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.
In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.
In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.
The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 
Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).
Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. Editioned screenprint by me available here.

Barbican Type 76 flats

Lookie look at my new screenprint! See the semi-circular window at the bottom with the light on? I used to live there, it’s what’s known as a Flat Type 76. There’s 14 of them in total and they are situated below podium in Andrewes House. They are double aspect with the living room looking out onto the waterfall, and the bedroom onto Fore Street.

The bedroom also has access to a private garden. A garden! In the middle of the City! Next to the bedroom is the bathroom, which unusually for the Barbican, has a small window that also looks onto the garden.

In the middle of the flat is the kitchen, which is very similar in layout to the more common Type 20 and 21 flats. As I’m sure you know already, the kitchens were designed by Brooke Marine — a firm of yacht designers,who were commissioned by Chamberlin Powell and Bon to come up with a design that was as efficient and space saving as possible.  A full-size mock-up of a kitchen was erected by the Gas Council, Watson House Research Centre, and was tested by going through the motions of preparing several different kinds of meals.

In 1963 to get around the recently passed bye-laws requiring all kitchens to have windows or equivalent ventilation, Chamberlin Powell and Bon renamed kitchens as ‘cooking areas’ and part of the living room (or in the case of a Type 76, the dining room) for the purpose of the regulations, and so they were approved by the London County Council.

The best feature of the flat in my opinion is the double height living room. From the dining room there’s a set of small step that take you down into the living room, and that window. 

Take a virtual tour of the a Type 76 flat here (although its not exactly accurate, but you’d have to be a real geek to notice).

Photograph of Isabel Marant © Chris Brooks. 
Editioned screenprint by me available here.

photo
2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatKeeling HouseClaredale StreetLondon E2£404 per week
Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.
The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Keeling House
Claredale Street
London E2
£404 per week

Designed by Denys Lasdun in 1952, Keeling House was the architect’s attempt to move away from the slab block which were popular at the time. The four winged design and central stair lift, encouraged you to interact with your neighbours.

The building ran into maintenance problems in the 80s, and in 1992 Tower Hamlets closed the building unable to afford to fix it. It was granted Grade II* listed status in 1993, and sold to a private developer in 1999 who worked (with Lasdun) on the renovation into luxury apartments.

View the listing here.