Page 1 of 23
RSS
Site logo for Modernist Estates

Modernist Estates

Listing modernist homes for sale, focussing on London post-war estates, plus findings on the way, including books, interviews, films and upcoming events. I also do this: thingsyoucanbuy.co.uk
Follow this Tumblr!
Follow me on Twitter

photo

Calling all Modernist Estate residents!
I’m looking for more people to interview for the ‘Modernist Lives’ section of this blog. Here’s my short list (but interested in others too!)— if you are a leaseholder in any of these and would like to be featured, I would love to hear from you—please contact me. 
—Trellick Tower (pictured, that’s Ernö Goldfinger, obvs)—Maiden Lane Estate—Lillington Gardens—Mansfield Road—Branch Hill—Spa Green—Bevin Court—Churchill Gardens—Alexandra and Ainsworth—The Water Gardens—Hallfield Estate—Byker Estate (I’m in Newcastle in two weeks time!)—26 St James Place (ha!)—Priory Green Estate—Central Hill Estate

Calling all Modernist Estate residents!

I’m looking for more people to interview for the ‘Modernist Lives’ section of this blog. Here’s my short list (but interested in others too!)— if you are a leaseholder in any of these and would like to be featured, I would love to hear from you—please contact me

—Trellick Tower (pictured, that’s Ernö Goldfinger, obvs)
—Maiden Lane Estate
—Lillington Gardens
—Mansfield Road
—Branch Hill
—Spa Green
—Bevin Court
—Churchill Gardens
—Alexandra and Ainsworth
—The Water Gardens
—Hallfield Estate
—Byker Estate (I’m in Newcastle in two weeks time!)
—26 St James Place (ha!)
—Priory Green Estate
—Central Hill Estate

video

Good news!

British Pathé have put their archive on YouTube
Here’s a film about the New Town ‘Stevenage’.

photo
Here are some photographs of 10 Regents Park Road by Goldfinger I found in a 1963 copy of ‘Architecture Design’. Here are some photographs of 10 Regents Park Road by Goldfinger I found in a 1963 copy of ‘Architecture Design’. Here are some photographs of 10 Regents Park Road by Goldfinger I found in a 1963 copy of ‘Architecture Design’.

Here are some photographs of 10 Regents Park Road by Goldfinger I found in a 1963 copy of ‘Architecture Design’.

photo
Studio flat10 Regents Park RoadLondon NW1£550,000
Excuse the rather lazy copying and pasting, but hey, it’s almost midnight:
Designed in 1954—56, No.10 Regent’s Park Road is one of Ernö Goldfinger’s first post-war works. In 1952 a group of people formed themselves into a co-operative to build themselves homes under the 1936 Housing Act, which allowed Housing Societies or Associations to raise a loan or mortgage through local authorities. The flats were collectively owned by the Society, which elected  officers to represent them in dealing with the architect, builder and St Pancras council, through whom they obtained the 90% mortgage. Few such societies were formed because of potential legal difficulties, though they were the most common way of building in eg. Scandanavia at the time, and the venture attracted considerable interest. The design and fittings, though simple, were of high quality at a time when building licences were still restricted for private building.
It marks the first stage of his progression from the restrained modern classicism of his Willow Road terrace (here as there brick is still the dominant material), towards the tougher, exposed grid — which is first seen here — and which was to go on to dominate his late, great projects. The bold expression of the balconies, with their mannered, pre-cast  panels, is seen particularly as a foretaste both of Goldfinger’s later works and the general development of a tougher architectural idiom in brick and concrete by younger architects from 1958 onwards. The contrast of red brick and concrete with the neighbouring stuccoed terraces is remarkable. The flats are also important in their own right as one of Goldfinger’s most successful and least altered domestic works, and as a most interesting example of how ten flats could be provided on a tiny gap site. 
The block consists of 4 storeys and attic, each originally with two flats per floor; those to ground floor and attic are studios, set  behind garages and roof terrace respectively. Flats C and D are now combined. Basement laundry, garden room and storage areas. 
The principal elevation is a symmetrical composition above the ground floor, which has entrance offset by double garage to left. These and garage to right have varnished timber doors. Door and surrounds glazed with Georgian wired glass. Flats have continuous metal casement windows. Balconies are angled, with metal balustrades to side contrasting with precast panelsto front. The whole facade a careful composition of contrasting materials and finishes. Rear facade simple, but ground-floor studios with similar balconies to those on front. Ten letter boxes arranged in two rows. 
The interior is also of interest. Entrance hall with quarry tile floor leads to staircase set in central structural well. Cantilevered staircase without risers, the slender steel balustrades springing from the side of the treads in a manner comparable to that found in the spiral stair of Goldfinger’s demolished Player House. The first floor with two 2-bedroom flats, the second and third floors each with one 1-bedroom and one 3-bedroom flat, all originally with folding screens between living room, dining area and kitchen with fitted cupboards, and with mahogany veneered fitted bedroom cupboards. Goldfinger originally provided tiled bathrooms, and specified bathroom fittings and suggested colour schemes. Living rooms and studios originally with thermoplastic acotiles tiled floors similar to those in Goldfinger’s own Willow Road. Source: British Listed Buildings. I can’t see much original left here though. In fact this flat first came onto the market back in November, and was under offer fairly quickly. For some reason it seems to be back on the market. View the listing here. 
Exterior image: © James Barras via Flickr Studio flat10 Regents Park RoadLondon NW1£550,000
Excuse the rather lazy copying and pasting, but hey, it’s almost midnight:
Designed in 1954—56, No.10 Regent’s Park Road is one of Ernö Goldfinger’s first post-war works. In 1952 a group of people formed themselves into a co-operative to build themselves homes under the 1936 Housing Act, which allowed Housing Societies or Associations to raise a loan or mortgage through local authorities. The flats were collectively owned by the Society, which elected  officers to represent them in dealing with the architect, builder and St Pancras council, through whom they obtained the 90% mortgage. Few such societies were formed because of potential legal difficulties, though they were the most common way of building in eg. Scandanavia at the time, and the venture attracted considerable interest. The design and fittings, though simple, were of high quality at a time when building licences were still restricted for private building.
It marks the first stage of his progression from the restrained modern classicism of his Willow Road terrace (here as there brick is still the dominant material), towards the tougher, exposed grid — which is first seen here — and which was to go on to dominate his late, great projects. The bold expression of the balconies, with their mannered, pre-cast  panels, is seen particularly as a foretaste both of Goldfinger’s later works and the general development of a tougher architectural idiom in brick and concrete by younger architects from 1958 onwards. The contrast of red brick and concrete with the neighbouring stuccoed terraces is remarkable. The flats are also important in their own right as one of Goldfinger’s most successful and least altered domestic works, and as a most interesting example of how ten flats could be provided on a tiny gap site. 
The block consists of 4 storeys and attic, each originally with two flats per floor; those to ground floor and attic are studios, set  behind garages and roof terrace respectively. Flats C and D are now combined. Basement laundry, garden room and storage areas. 
The principal elevation is a symmetrical composition above the ground floor, which has entrance offset by double garage to left. These and garage to right have varnished timber doors. Door and surrounds glazed with Georgian wired glass. Flats have continuous metal casement windows. Balconies are angled, with metal balustrades to side contrasting with precast panelsto front. The whole facade a careful composition of contrasting materials and finishes. Rear facade simple, but ground-floor studios with similar balconies to those on front. Ten letter boxes arranged in two rows. 
The interior is also of interest. Entrance hall with quarry tile floor leads to staircase set in central structural well. Cantilevered staircase without risers, the slender steel balustrades springing from the side of the treads in a manner comparable to that found in the spiral stair of Goldfinger’s demolished Player House. The first floor with two 2-bedroom flats, the second and third floors each with one 1-bedroom and one 3-bedroom flat, all originally with folding screens between living room, dining area and kitchen with fitted cupboards, and with mahogany veneered fitted bedroom cupboards. Goldfinger originally provided tiled bathrooms, and specified bathroom fittings and suggested colour schemes. Living rooms and studios originally with thermoplastic acotiles tiled floors similar to those in Goldfinger’s own Willow Road. Source: British Listed Buildings. I can’t see much original left here though. In fact this flat first came onto the market back in November, and was under offer fairly quickly. For some reason it seems to be back on the market. View the listing here. 
Exterior image: © James Barras via Flickr Studio flat10 Regents Park RoadLondon NW1£550,000
Excuse the rather lazy copying and pasting, but hey, it’s almost midnight:
Designed in 1954—56, No.10 Regent’s Park Road is one of Ernö Goldfinger’s first post-war works. In 1952 a group of people formed themselves into a co-operative to build themselves homes under the 1936 Housing Act, which allowed Housing Societies or Associations to raise a loan or mortgage through local authorities. The flats were collectively owned by the Society, which elected  officers to represent them in dealing with the architect, builder and St Pancras council, through whom they obtained the 90% mortgage. Few such societies were formed because of potential legal difficulties, though they were the most common way of building in eg. Scandanavia at the time, and the venture attracted considerable interest. The design and fittings, though simple, were of high quality at a time when building licences were still restricted for private building.
It marks the first stage of his progression from the restrained modern classicism of his Willow Road terrace (here as there brick is still the dominant material), towards the tougher, exposed grid — which is first seen here — and which was to go on to dominate his late, great projects. The bold expression of the balconies, with their mannered, pre-cast  panels, is seen particularly as a foretaste both of Goldfinger’s later works and the general development of a tougher architectural idiom in brick and concrete by younger architects from 1958 onwards. The contrast of red brick and concrete with the neighbouring stuccoed terraces is remarkable. The flats are also important in their own right as one of Goldfinger’s most successful and least altered domestic works, and as a most interesting example of how ten flats could be provided on a tiny gap site. 
The block consists of 4 storeys and attic, each originally with two flats per floor; those to ground floor and attic are studios, set  behind garages and roof terrace respectively. Flats C and D are now combined. Basement laundry, garden room and storage areas. 
The principal elevation is a symmetrical composition above the ground floor, which has entrance offset by double garage to left. These and garage to right have varnished timber doors. Door and surrounds glazed with Georgian wired glass. Flats have continuous metal casement windows. Balconies are angled, with metal balustrades to side contrasting with precast panelsto front. The whole facade a careful composition of contrasting materials and finishes. Rear facade simple, but ground-floor studios with similar balconies to those on front. Ten letter boxes arranged in two rows. 
The interior is also of interest. Entrance hall with quarry tile floor leads to staircase set in central structural well. Cantilevered staircase without risers, the slender steel balustrades springing from the side of the treads in a manner comparable to that found in the spiral stair of Goldfinger’s demolished Player House. The first floor with two 2-bedroom flats, the second and third floors each with one 1-bedroom and one 3-bedroom flat, all originally with folding screens between living room, dining area and kitchen with fitted cupboards, and with mahogany veneered fitted bedroom cupboards. Goldfinger originally provided tiled bathrooms, and specified bathroom fittings and suggested colour schemes. Living rooms and studios originally with thermoplastic acotiles tiled floors similar to those in Goldfinger’s own Willow Road. Source: British Listed Buildings. I can’t see much original left here though. In fact this flat first came onto the market back in November, and was under offer fairly quickly. For some reason it seems to be back on the market. View the listing here. 
Exterior image: © James Barras via Flickr Studio flat10 Regents Park RoadLondon NW1£550,000
Excuse the rather lazy copying and pasting, but hey, it’s almost midnight:
Designed in 1954—56, No.10 Regent’s Park Road is one of Ernö Goldfinger’s first post-war works. In 1952 a group of people formed themselves into a co-operative to build themselves homes under the 1936 Housing Act, which allowed Housing Societies or Associations to raise a loan or mortgage through local authorities. The flats were collectively owned by the Society, which elected  officers to represent them in dealing with the architect, builder and St Pancras council, through whom they obtained the 90% mortgage. Few such societies were formed because of potential legal difficulties, though they were the most common way of building in eg. Scandanavia at the time, and the venture attracted considerable interest. The design and fittings, though simple, were of high quality at a time when building licences were still restricted for private building.
It marks the first stage of his progression from the restrained modern classicism of his Willow Road terrace (here as there brick is still the dominant material), towards the tougher, exposed grid — which is first seen here — and which was to go on to dominate his late, great projects. The bold expression of the balconies, with their mannered, pre-cast  panels, is seen particularly as a foretaste both of Goldfinger’s later works and the general development of a tougher architectural idiom in brick and concrete by younger architects from 1958 onwards. The contrast of red brick and concrete with the neighbouring stuccoed terraces is remarkable. The flats are also important in their own right as one of Goldfinger’s most successful and least altered domestic works, and as a most interesting example of how ten flats could be provided on a tiny gap site. 
The block consists of 4 storeys and attic, each originally with two flats per floor; those to ground floor and attic are studios, set  behind garages and roof terrace respectively. Flats C and D are now combined. Basement laundry, garden room and storage areas. 
The principal elevation is a symmetrical composition above the ground floor, which has entrance offset by double garage to left. These and garage to right have varnished timber doors. Door and surrounds glazed with Georgian wired glass. Flats have continuous metal casement windows. Balconies are angled, with metal balustrades to side contrasting with precast panelsto front. The whole facade a careful composition of contrasting materials and finishes. Rear facade simple, but ground-floor studios with similar balconies to those on front. Ten letter boxes arranged in two rows. 
The interior is also of interest. Entrance hall with quarry tile floor leads to staircase set in central structural well. Cantilevered staircase without risers, the slender steel balustrades springing from the side of the treads in a manner comparable to that found in the spiral stair of Goldfinger’s demolished Player House. The first floor with two 2-bedroom flats, the second and third floors each with one 1-bedroom and one 3-bedroom flat, all originally with folding screens between living room, dining area and kitchen with fitted cupboards, and with mahogany veneered fitted bedroom cupboards. Goldfinger originally provided tiled bathrooms, and specified bathroom fittings and suggested colour schemes. Living rooms and studios originally with thermoplastic acotiles tiled floors similar to those in Goldfinger’s own Willow Road. Source: British Listed Buildings. I can’t see much original left here though. In fact this flat first came onto the market back in November, and was under offer fairly quickly. For some reason it seems to be back on the market. View the listing here. 
Exterior image: © James Barras via Flickr

Studio flat
10 Regents Park Road
London NW1
£550,000

Excuse the rather lazy copying and pasting, but hey, it’s almost midnight:

Designed in 1954—56, No.10 Regent’s Park Road is one of Ernö Goldfinger’s first post-war works. In 1952 a group of people formed themselves into a co-operative to build themselves homes under the 1936 Housing Act, which allowed Housing Societies or Associations to raise a loan or mortgage through local authorities. The flats were collectively owned by the Society, which elected  officers to represent them in dealing with the architect, builder and St Pancras council, through whom they obtained the 90% mortgage. Few such societies were formed because of potential legal difficulties, though they were the most common way of building in eg. Scandanavia at the time, and the venture attracted considerable interest. The design and fittings, though simple, were of high quality at a time when building licences were still restricted for private building.

It marks the first stage of his progression from the restrained modern classicism of his Willow Road terrace (here as there brick is still the dominant material), towards the tougher, exposed grid — which is first seen here — and which was to go on to dominate his late, great projects. The bold expression of the balconies, with their mannered, pre-cast  panels, is seen particularly as a foretaste both of Goldfinger’s later works and the general development of a tougher architectural idiom in brick and concrete by younger architects from 1958 onwards. The contrast of red brick and concrete with the neighbouring stuccoed terraces is remarkable. The flats are also important in their own right as one of Goldfinger’s most successful and least altered domestic works, and as a most interesting example of how ten flats could be provided on a tiny gap site. 

The block consists of 4 storeys and attic, each originally with two flats per floor; those to ground floor and attic are studios, set  behind garages and roof terrace respectively. Flats C and D are now combined. Basement laundry, garden room and storage areas. 

The principal elevation is a symmetrical composition above the ground floor, which has entrance offset by double garage to left. These and garage to right have varnished timber doors. Door and surrounds glazed with Georgian wired glass. Flats have continuous metal casement windows. Balconies are angled, with metal balustrades to side contrasting with precast panelsto front. The whole facade a careful composition of 
contrasting materials and finishes. Rear facade simple, but ground-floor studios with similar balconies to those on front. Ten letter boxes arranged in two rows. 

The interior is also of interest. Entrance hall with quarry tile floor leads to staircase set in central structural well. Cantilevered staircase without risers, the slender steel balustrades springing from the side of the treads in a manner comparable to that found in the spiral stair of Goldfinger’s demolished Player House. The first floor with two 2-bedroom flats, the second and third floors each with one 1-bedroom and one 3-bedroom flat, all originally with folding screens between living room, dining area and kitchen with fitted cupboards, and with mahogany veneered fitted bedroom cupboards. Goldfinger originally provided tiled bathrooms, and specified bathroom fittings and suggested colour schemes. Living rooms and studios originally with thermoplastic acotiles tiled floors similar to those in Goldfinger’s own Willow Road. 
Source: British Listed Buildings. 

I can’t see much original left here though. In fact this flat first came onto the market back in November, and was under offer fairly quickly. For some reason it seems to be back on the market. View the listing here

Exterior image: © James Barras via Flickr

photo
2 Bedroom flatLangham CloseHamSurrey£399,950
Designed by Stirling and Gowan, Langham Close is a Grade II* development designed 1957–58. It comprises of the three apartment buildings which are carefully arranged in the long narrow back garden site of a Georgian manor house facing onto Ham Common. 
More about the scheme on the Twentieth Century Society website.
View this two bedroom property listing here.
  2 Bedroom flatLangham CloseHamSurrey£399,950
Designed by Stirling and Gowan, Langham Close is a Grade II* development designed 1957–58. It comprises of the three apartment buildings which are carefully arranged in the long narrow back garden site of a Georgian manor house facing onto Ham Common. 
More about the scheme on the Twentieth Century Society website.
View this two bedroom property listing here.
  2 Bedroom flatLangham CloseHamSurrey£399,950
Designed by Stirling and Gowan, Langham Close is a Grade II* development designed 1957–58. It comprises of the three apartment buildings which are carefully arranged in the long narrow back garden site of a Georgian manor house facing onto Ham Common. 
More about the scheme on the Twentieth Century Society website.
View this two bedroom property listing here.
  2 Bedroom flatLangham CloseHamSurrey£399,950
Designed by Stirling and Gowan, Langham Close is a Grade II* development designed 1957–58. It comprises of the three apartment buildings which are carefully arranged in the long narrow back garden site of a Georgian manor house facing onto Ham Common. 
More about the scheme on the Twentieth Century Society website.
View this two bedroom property listing here.
  2 Bedroom flatLangham CloseHamSurrey£399,950
Designed by Stirling and Gowan, Langham Close is a Grade II* development designed 1957–58. It comprises of the three apartment buildings which are carefully arranged in the long narrow back garden site of a Georgian manor house facing onto Ham Common. 
More about the scheme on the Twentieth Century Society website.
View this two bedroom property listing here.
 

2 Bedroom flat
Langham Close
Ham
Surrey
£399,950

Designed by Stirling and Gowan, Langham Close is a Grade II* development designed 1957–58. It comprises of the three apartment buildings which are carefully arranged in the long narrow back garden site of a Georgian manor house facing onto Ham Common.

More about the scheme on the Twentieth Century Society website.

View this two bedroom property listing here.

 

photo
3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom flatMountjoy HouseBarbicanLondon EC2£1,500,000
In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 
It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.
As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.
Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 
Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.
Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.
God I want this flat! 
View the listing here.

3 Bedroom flat
Mountjoy House
Barbican
London EC2
£1,500,000

In my opinion these flats are the best layout of all the Barbican flat types. And I should know, I was lucky enough to live in one when I first moved to London. What started as kind hearted gesture “I have a room in my flat you can stay in for a bit if you have nowhere to live” by then Art Director of GQ magazine, Tony Chambers (now editor of Wallpaper), turned into 7 years, until I eventually evicted myself and moved to neighbouring Golden Lane Estate. 

It was during these seven years that my love affair with the Barbican and modernist architecture began.

As soon as you walk into one of these flats (known as a type 35) I guarantee you will will say ‘wow’. You come into a jaw-dropping double-height living room, and it’s big and it’s full of light and it’s just terrific.

Leading off the living room is a dining room, which can be closed off with concertina doors (which never seem to work that well actually). Off the dining room is the galley kitchen, and in this case it’s original. In fact the whole of this flat seems to be pretty much original. The uncarpeted floor and mucky walls make it look in a lot worse condition than it actually is. 

Also on the ground floor, you will find a double bedroom with built-in storage and access to the downstairs balcony. There is also a bathroom and a separate WC.

Up the stairs (which have been painted white in this case, so you will need to strip them to reveal a lovely warm teak — I think it’s teak anyway) there are two further bedrooms, one is double height barrel vaulted, and both with access to a really generous terrace. There’s also a bathroom, again double height barrel vaulted.

God I want this flat! 

View the listing here.

photo

Modernist Estates is a year old!Wowzers, I only started this for myself really—as a record of flats I’d come across to help with my bad memory. You’ve all been amazingly kind, so thank you for all your kind messages and support for the blog over the last year. Who wants to place a bet to see whether I will actually move in the next 12 months?
Image: Architects dressed up as their buildings at the Beaux Arts Ball in 1931. From left to right: A Stewart Walker as the Fuller Building, Leonard Schultze as the Waldorf-Astoria, Ely Jacques Kahn as the Squibb Building, William Van Alen as the Chrysler, Ralph walker as 1 Wall Street, D.E.Ward as the Metropolitan Tower and Joseph H. Freelander as the museum of New York. Thanks to Dal Chodha for bringing this image to my eyes. 

Modernist Estates is a year old!
Wowzers, I only started this for myself really—as a record of flats I’d come across to help with my bad memory. You’ve all been amazingly kind, so thank you for all your kind messages and support for the blog over the last year. Who wants to place a bet to see whether I will actually move in the next 12 months?

Image: Architects dressed up as their buildings at the Beaux Arts Ball in 1931. From left to right: A Stewart Walker as the Fuller Building, Leonard Schultze as the Waldorf-Astoria, Ely Jacques Kahn as the Squibb Building, William Van Alen as the Chrysler, Ralph walker as 1 Wall Street, D.E.Ward as the Metropolitan Tower and Joseph H. Freelander as the museum of New York. Thanks to Dal Chodha for bringing this image to my eyes. 

photo
3 Bedroom flatAlexandra and Ainsworth EstateRowley WayLondon NW8£475,000
I don’t think the estate agent got the memo about these flats being unmortgageable… (is that a word?)
It’ll be interesting to see what happens with the price — but it is a really good sized flat over two floors. Judging by the floor-plan the kitchen is huge! Along with the kitchen on the ground floor there’s a living room and a bedroom and what looks like funny little storage rooms, upstairs there are two double bedrooms, with the built in storage, and a bathroom and separate WC.
View the listing here.

3 Bedroom flatAlexandra and Ainsworth EstateRowley WayLondon NW8£475,000
I don’t think the estate agent got the memo about these flats being unmortgageable… (is that a word?)
It’ll be interesting to see what happens with the price — but it is a really good sized flat over two floors. Judging by the floor-plan the kitchen is huge! Along with the kitchen on the ground floor there’s a living room and a bedroom and what looks like funny little storage rooms, upstairs there are two double bedrooms, with the built in storage, and a bathroom and separate WC.
View the listing here.

3 Bedroom flatAlexandra and Ainsworth EstateRowley WayLondon NW8£475,000
I don’t think the estate agent got the memo about these flats being unmortgageable… (is that a word?)
It’ll be interesting to see what happens with the price — but it is a really good sized flat over two floors. Judging by the floor-plan the kitchen is huge! Along with the kitchen on the ground floor there’s a living room and a bedroom and what looks like funny little storage rooms, upstairs there are two double bedrooms, with the built in storage, and a bathroom and separate WC.
View the listing here.

3 Bedroom flatAlexandra and Ainsworth EstateRowley WayLondon NW8£475,000
I don’t think the estate agent got the memo about these flats being unmortgageable… (is that a word?)
It’ll be interesting to see what happens with the price — but it is a really good sized flat over two floors. Judging by the floor-plan the kitchen is huge! Along with the kitchen on the ground floor there’s a living room and a bedroom and what looks like funny little storage rooms, upstairs there are two double bedrooms, with the built in storage, and a bathroom and separate WC.
View the listing here.

3 Bedroom flat
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate
Rowley Way
London NW8
£475,000

I don’t think the estate agent got the memo about these flats being unmortgageable… (is that a word?)

It’ll be interesting to see what happens with the price — but it is a really good sized flat over two floors. Judging by the floor-plan the kitchen is huge! Along with the kitchen on the ground floor there’s a living room and a bedroom and what looks like funny little storage rooms, upstairs there are two double bedrooms, with the built in storage, and a bathroom and separate WC.

View the listing here.

photo
2 Bedroom flatParkleysHam, RichmondSurrey£329,950(£5,025 per square metre)
A nice looking two bedroom Eric Lyons Span flat, albeit with few original features. The Parkleys was designed and built between 1953 and 1959 consisting of 169 flats and 6 shops. It was Grade II listed in 1998.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatParkleysHam, RichmondSurrey£329,950(£5,025 per square metre)
A nice looking two bedroom Eric Lyons Span flat, albeit with few original features. The Parkleys was designed and built between 1953 and 1959 consisting of 169 flats and 6 shops. It was Grade II listed in 1998.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatParkleysHam, RichmondSurrey£329,950(£5,025 per square metre)
A nice looking two bedroom Eric Lyons Span flat, albeit with few original features. The Parkleys was designed and built between 1953 and 1959 consisting of 169 flats and 6 shops. It was Grade II listed in 1998.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatParkleysHam, RichmondSurrey£329,950(£5,025 per square metre)
A nice looking two bedroom Eric Lyons Span flat, albeit with few original features. The Parkleys was designed and built between 1953 and 1959 consisting of 169 flats and 6 shops. It was Grade II listed in 1998.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatParkleysHam, RichmondSurrey£329,950(£5,025 per square metre)
A nice looking two bedroom Eric Lyons Span flat, albeit with few original features. The Parkleys was designed and built between 1953 and 1959 consisting of 169 flats and 6 shops. It was Grade II listed in 1998.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatParkleysHam, RichmondSurrey£329,950(£5,025 per square metre)
A nice looking two bedroom Eric Lyons Span flat, albeit with few original features. The Parkleys was designed and built between 1953 and 1959 consisting of 169 flats and 6 shops. It was Grade II listed in 1998.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Parkleys
Ham, Richmond
Surrey
£329,950
(£5,025 per square metre)

A nice looking two bedroom Eric Lyons Span flat, albeit with few original features. The Parkleys was designed and built between 1953 and 1959 consisting of 169 flats and 6 shops. It was Grade II listed in 1998.

View the listing here.

photo
2 Bedroom flatApex DriveFrimley Surrey£265,000This is the second property I’ve seen this week that is achingly affordable and trying to lure me to Surrey. The other I am keeping under my hat, until I view it next week. Even though last week I’d made the decision to stay put in EC1. We’ll see.
So… Apex Drive (these photos really don’t do justice to the buildings—please Google other pictures) was designed by Laurie Abbott in 1966. Abbott, who until his recent retirement was a senior director at the Richard Rogers Partnership, has been an instrumental figure on some of the most significant architectural achievements of the 20th century, including the Pompidou Centre and Lloyd’s of London. The development was built by the Apex Society, founded in 1965, to provide ‘affordable housing in Greater London and the Home Counties’.
The apartments were sold off under a scheme that allowed the occupants to purchase 45 per cent of their property, and each applicant had to be accepted onto the scheme under strict qualifying guidelines. By 1981, the rules were relaxed and people were allowed to buy their properties outright and sell them on as they wished.
The development is made up of eight blocks, each containing four apartments. They were originally known as ‘the upside down houses’, as they incorporated an upstairs kitchen and a downstairs sitting room. The properties are built from grey brick and white mortar which contains sparkly quartz. Each block is a square, divided by a kind of flattened S-shaped wall which produces an interesting internal curved wall for each apartment, ending with a curved window where it meets the outside wall. The guttering is hidden within the fabric of the walls.
As for the interior of this particular apartment, well they’ve obviously recently spruced it up. I personally rather they hadn’t bothered, but I’ve seen worse.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatApex DriveFrimley Surrey£265,000This is the second property I’ve seen this week that is achingly affordable and trying to lure me to Surrey. The other I am keeping under my hat, until I view it next week. Even though last week I’d made the decision to stay put in EC1. We’ll see.
So… Apex Drive (these photos really don’t do justice to the buildings—please Google other pictures) was designed by Laurie Abbott in 1966. Abbott, who until his recent retirement was a senior director at the Richard Rogers Partnership, has been an instrumental figure on some of the most significant architectural achievements of the 20th century, including the Pompidou Centre and Lloyd’s of London. The development was built by the Apex Society, founded in 1965, to provide ‘affordable housing in Greater London and the Home Counties’.
The apartments were sold off under a scheme that allowed the occupants to purchase 45 per cent of their property, and each applicant had to be accepted onto the scheme under strict qualifying guidelines. By 1981, the rules were relaxed and people were allowed to buy their properties outright and sell them on as they wished.
The development is made up of eight blocks, each containing four apartments. They were originally known as ‘the upside down houses’, as they incorporated an upstairs kitchen and a downstairs sitting room. The properties are built from grey brick and white mortar which contains sparkly quartz. Each block is a square, divided by a kind of flattened S-shaped wall which produces an interesting internal curved wall for each apartment, ending with a curved window where it meets the outside wall. The guttering is hidden within the fabric of the walls.
As for the interior of this particular apartment, well they’ve obviously recently spruced it up. I personally rather they hadn’t bothered, but I’ve seen worse.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatApex DriveFrimley Surrey£265,000This is the second property I’ve seen this week that is achingly affordable and trying to lure me to Surrey. The other I am keeping under my hat, until I view it next week. Even though last week I’d made the decision to stay put in EC1. We’ll see.
So… Apex Drive (these photos really don’t do justice to the buildings—please Google other pictures) was designed by Laurie Abbott in 1966. Abbott, who until his recent retirement was a senior director at the Richard Rogers Partnership, has been an instrumental figure on some of the most significant architectural achievements of the 20th century, including the Pompidou Centre and Lloyd’s of London. The development was built by the Apex Society, founded in 1965, to provide ‘affordable housing in Greater London and the Home Counties’.
The apartments were sold off under a scheme that allowed the occupants to purchase 45 per cent of their property, and each applicant had to be accepted onto the scheme under strict qualifying guidelines. By 1981, the rules were relaxed and people were allowed to buy their properties outright and sell them on as they wished.
The development is made up of eight blocks, each containing four apartments. They were originally known as ‘the upside down houses’, as they incorporated an upstairs kitchen and a downstairs sitting room. The properties are built from grey brick and white mortar which contains sparkly quartz. Each block is a square, divided by a kind of flattened S-shaped wall which produces an interesting internal curved wall for each apartment, ending with a curved window where it meets the outside wall. The guttering is hidden within the fabric of the walls.
As for the interior of this particular apartment, well they’ve obviously recently spruced it up. I personally rather they hadn’t bothered, but I’ve seen worse.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatApex DriveFrimley Surrey£265,000This is the second property I’ve seen this week that is achingly affordable and trying to lure me to Surrey. The other I am keeping under my hat, until I view it next week. Even though last week I’d made the decision to stay put in EC1. We’ll see.
So… Apex Drive (these photos really don’t do justice to the buildings—please Google other pictures) was designed by Laurie Abbott in 1966. Abbott, who until his recent retirement was a senior director at the Richard Rogers Partnership, has been an instrumental figure on some of the most significant architectural achievements of the 20th century, including the Pompidou Centre and Lloyd’s of London. The development was built by the Apex Society, founded in 1965, to provide ‘affordable housing in Greater London and the Home Counties’.
The apartments were sold off under a scheme that allowed the occupants to purchase 45 per cent of their property, and each applicant had to be accepted onto the scheme under strict qualifying guidelines. By 1981, the rules were relaxed and people were allowed to buy their properties outright and sell them on as they wished.
The development is made up of eight blocks, each containing four apartments. They were originally known as ‘the upside down houses’, as they incorporated an upstairs kitchen and a downstairs sitting room. The properties are built from grey brick and white mortar which contains sparkly quartz. Each block is a square, divided by a kind of flattened S-shaped wall which produces an interesting internal curved wall for each apartment, ending with a curved window where it meets the outside wall. The guttering is hidden within the fabric of the walls.
As for the interior of this particular apartment, well they’ve obviously recently spruced it up. I personally rather they hadn’t bothered, but I’ve seen worse.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatApex DriveFrimley Surrey£265,000This is the second property I’ve seen this week that is achingly affordable and trying to lure me to Surrey. The other I am keeping under my hat, until I view it next week. Even though last week I’d made the decision to stay put in EC1. We’ll see.
So… Apex Drive (these photos really don’t do justice to the buildings—please Google other pictures) was designed by Laurie Abbott in 1966. Abbott, who until his recent retirement was a senior director at the Richard Rogers Partnership, has been an instrumental figure on some of the most significant architectural achievements of the 20th century, including the Pompidou Centre and Lloyd’s of London. The development was built by the Apex Society, founded in 1965, to provide ‘affordable housing in Greater London and the Home Counties’.
The apartments were sold off under a scheme that allowed the occupants to purchase 45 per cent of their property, and each applicant had to be accepted onto the scheme under strict qualifying guidelines. By 1981, the rules were relaxed and people were allowed to buy their properties outright and sell them on as they wished.
The development is made up of eight blocks, each containing four apartments. They were originally known as ‘the upside down houses’, as they incorporated an upstairs kitchen and a downstairs sitting room. The properties are built from grey brick and white mortar which contains sparkly quartz. Each block is a square, divided by a kind of flattened S-shaped wall which produces an interesting internal curved wall for each apartment, ending with a curved window where it meets the outside wall. The guttering is hidden within the fabric of the walls.
As for the interior of this particular apartment, well they’ve obviously recently spruced it up. I personally rather they hadn’t bothered, but I’ve seen worse.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatApex DriveFrimley Surrey£265,000This is the second property I’ve seen this week that is achingly affordable and trying to lure me to Surrey. The other I am keeping under my hat, until I view it next week. Even though last week I’d made the decision to stay put in EC1. We’ll see.
So… Apex Drive (these photos really don’t do justice to the buildings—please Google other pictures) was designed by Laurie Abbott in 1966. Abbott, who until his recent retirement was a senior director at the Richard Rogers Partnership, has been an instrumental figure on some of the most significant architectural achievements of the 20th century, including the Pompidou Centre and Lloyd’s of London. The development was built by the Apex Society, founded in 1965, to provide ‘affordable housing in Greater London and the Home Counties’.
The apartments were sold off under a scheme that allowed the occupants to purchase 45 per cent of their property, and each applicant had to be accepted onto the scheme under strict qualifying guidelines. By 1981, the rules were relaxed and people were allowed to buy their properties outright and sell them on as they wished.
The development is made up of eight blocks, each containing four apartments. They were originally known as ‘the upside down houses’, as they incorporated an upstairs kitchen and a downstairs sitting room. The properties are built from grey brick and white mortar which contains sparkly quartz. Each block is a square, divided by a kind of flattened S-shaped wall which produces an interesting internal curved wall for each apartment, ending with a curved window where it meets the outside wall. The guttering is hidden within the fabric of the walls.
As for the interior of this particular apartment, well they’ve obviously recently spruced it up. I personally rather they hadn’t bothered, but I’ve seen worse.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Apex Drive
Frimley 
Surrey
£265,000

This is the second property I’ve seen this week that is achingly affordable and trying to lure me to Surrey. The other I am keeping under my hat, until I view it next week. Even though last week I’d made the decision to stay put in EC1. We’ll see.

So… Apex Drive (these photos really don’t do justice to the buildings—please Google other pictures) was designed by Laurie Abbott in 1966. Abbott, who until his recent retirement was a senior director at the Richard Rogers Partnership, has been an instrumental figure on some of the most significant architectural achievements of the 20th century, including the Pompidou Centre and Lloyd’s of London. The development was built by the Apex Society, founded in 1965, to provide ‘affordable housing in Greater London and the Home Counties’.

The apartments were sold off under a scheme that allowed the occupants to purchase 45 per cent of their property, and each applicant had to be accepted onto the scheme under strict qualifying guidelines. By 1981, the rules were relaxed and people were allowed to buy their properties outright and sell them on as they wished.

The development is made up of eight blocks, each containing four apartments. They were originally known as ‘the upside down houses’, as they incorporated an upstairs kitchen and a downstairs sitting room. The properties are built from grey brick and white mortar which contains sparkly quartz. Each block is a square, divided by a kind of flattened S-shaped wall which produces an interesting internal curved wall for each apartment, ending with a curved window where it meets the outside wall. The guttering is hidden within the fabric of the walls.

As for the interior of this particular apartment, well they’ve obviously recently spruced it up. I personally rather they hadn’t bothered, but I’ve seen worse.

View the listing here.

photo
2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows 2 Bedroom flatPark CourtSydenham London SE26£399,995(£5479 per square metre)
Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 
Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.
The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 
The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 
View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows

2 Bedroom flat
Park Court
Sydenham 
London SE26
£399,995
(£5479 per square metre)

Park Court is a private development designed in the 1930s by Frederick Gibberd (better known for Pullman Court in Streatham) the flats were built to a very high specification, with patented double-floors to reduce noise, electrical heaters in airing cupboards and beneath the deep lounge windows, and an ‘Ascot’ instant hot water system for the kitchen and bathroom. 

Park Court was regarded as a notable development from the start, and widely written-up when it was completed. The average rent for a flat in 1936 was £140 per year.

The 1980s saw the addition of the ‘Mansard’ flats at the top of the building, so gone is the elegant flat roof. And gone are the original features from the interior of this flat. 

The archive images are from Gibberd’s ‘Modern House’ book showing the original interior. Such glamour! 

View the listing here.

PS. uPVC windows

photo
2 Bedroom flatBrandon EstateOtto StreetLondon SE17£195,000
Don’t get too excited about the price, it’s cash buyers only. But to be honest, that still doesn’t seem bad in the current climate.
In 1954 Ted Hollamby set up a new team in London county council’s housing division, working initially on the Avebury estate, Bethnal Green, where he provided its low-rise elements with pitched roofs and introduced public sculpture. His greatest achievement at the LCC was the Brandon estate, Kennington, largely completed in 1960, where he formed a team to recondition some of the better Victorian houses. He was also responsible for a new shopping centre, community buildings, and housing consisting of forty low-rise blocks and six eighteen-storey point block. This marked the council’s introduction of high-rise housing to inner London. His intervention also secured for the estate a sculpture by Henry Moore. Hollamby then took on a general responsibility for housing in south London, working most closely on the large Pepys estate in Deptford and producing, from March 1962, the first designs for Erith marshes, the forerunner of the larger Thamesmead development, with housing on platforms and raised decks for a population of 25,000.
This two bedroom flat, situated in one of the towers (looks a little low perhaps?) has just under 60 square metres of living space, with a separate kitchen, living room and a private balcony accessed through either the living room or master bedroom.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatBrandon EstateOtto StreetLondon SE17£195,000
Don’t get too excited about the price, it’s cash buyers only. But to be honest, that still doesn’t seem bad in the current climate.
In 1954 Ted Hollamby set up a new team in London county council’s housing division, working initially on the Avebury estate, Bethnal Green, where he provided its low-rise elements with pitched roofs and introduced public sculpture. His greatest achievement at the LCC was the Brandon estate, Kennington, largely completed in 1960, where he formed a team to recondition some of the better Victorian houses. He was also responsible for a new shopping centre, community buildings, and housing consisting of forty low-rise blocks and six eighteen-storey point block. This marked the council’s introduction of high-rise housing to inner London. His intervention also secured for the estate a sculpture by Henry Moore. Hollamby then took on a general responsibility for housing in south London, working most closely on the large Pepys estate in Deptford and producing, from March 1962, the first designs for Erith marshes, the forerunner of the larger Thamesmead development, with housing on platforms and raised decks for a population of 25,000.
This two bedroom flat, situated in one of the towers (looks a little low perhaps?) has just under 60 square metres of living space, with a separate kitchen, living room and a private balcony accessed through either the living room or master bedroom.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatBrandon EstateOtto StreetLondon SE17£195,000
Don’t get too excited about the price, it’s cash buyers only. But to be honest, that still doesn’t seem bad in the current climate.
In 1954 Ted Hollamby set up a new team in London county council’s housing division, working initially on the Avebury estate, Bethnal Green, where he provided its low-rise elements with pitched roofs and introduced public sculpture. His greatest achievement at the LCC was the Brandon estate, Kennington, largely completed in 1960, where he formed a team to recondition some of the better Victorian houses. He was also responsible for a new shopping centre, community buildings, and housing consisting of forty low-rise blocks and six eighteen-storey point block. This marked the council’s introduction of high-rise housing to inner London. His intervention also secured for the estate a sculpture by Henry Moore. Hollamby then took on a general responsibility for housing in south London, working most closely on the large Pepys estate in Deptford and producing, from March 1962, the first designs for Erith marshes, the forerunner of the larger Thamesmead development, with housing on platforms and raised decks for a population of 25,000.
This two bedroom flat, situated in one of the towers (looks a little low perhaps?) has just under 60 square metres of living space, with a separate kitchen, living room and a private balcony accessed through either the living room or master bedroom.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
Brandon Estate
Otto Street
London SE17
£195,000

Don’t get too excited about the price, it’s cash buyers only. But to be honest, that still doesn’t seem bad in the current climate.

In 1954 Ted Hollamby set up a new team in London county council’s housing division, working initially on the Avebury estate, Bethnal Green, where he provided its low-rise elements with pitched roofs and introduced public sculpture. His greatest achievement at the LCC was the Brandon estate, Kennington, largely completed in 1960, where he formed a team to recondition some of the better Victorian houses. He was also responsible for a new shopping centre, community buildings, and housing consisting of forty low-rise blocks and six eighteen-storey point block. This marked the council’s introduction of high-rise housing to inner London. His intervention also secured for the estate a sculpture by Henry Moore. Hollamby then took on a general responsibility for housing in south London, working most closely on the large Pepys estate in Deptford and producing, from March 1962, the first designs for Erith marshes, the forerunner of the larger Thamesmead development, with housing on platforms and raised decks for a population of 25,000.

This two bedroom flat, situated in one of the towers (looks a little low perhaps?) has just under 60 square metres of living space, with a separate kitchen, living room and a private balcony accessed through either the living room or master bedroom.

View the listing here.

photo
Homes in the Sky1966
When I first read that five of the remaining Red Road flats, the iconic towers in Glasgow, are to be demolished live as part of the opening ceremony for the Commonwealth Games, I honestly thought it was an April fools joke.
The Red Road estate was a development of eight tower blocks in the north east of Glasgow between Balornock and Barmulloch.
The steel-framed high-rise flats were designed in 1962 by architect Sam Bunton for Glasgow Corporation (later Glasgow City Council) and built between 1964 and 1969.
Six of the eight blocks were traditional point-shaped and had 30 storeys. Two were broader slab-shaped and had 25 storeys. The eight blocks were designed to accommodate about 4,700 people and the early residents welcomed the move from overcrowded and rundown tenement flats into the clean and modern tower blocks.
Here’s a wee promotional British Pathé film about the flats as they were being built.
britishpathe.com/video/homes-in-the-sky/query/glasgow+flats Homes in the Sky1966
When I first read that five of the remaining Red Road flats, the iconic towers in Glasgow, are to be demolished live as part of the opening ceremony for the Commonwealth Games, I honestly thought it was an April fools joke.
The Red Road estate was a development of eight tower blocks in the north east of Glasgow between Balornock and Barmulloch.
The steel-framed high-rise flats were designed in 1962 by architect Sam Bunton for Glasgow Corporation (later Glasgow City Council) and built between 1964 and 1969.
Six of the eight blocks were traditional point-shaped and had 30 storeys. Two were broader slab-shaped and had 25 storeys. The eight blocks were designed to accommodate about 4,700 people and the early residents welcomed the move from overcrowded and rundown tenement flats into the clean and modern tower blocks.
Here’s a wee promotional British Pathé film about the flats as they were being built.
britishpathe.com/video/homes-in-the-sky/query/glasgow+flats

Homes in the Sky
1966

When I first read that five of the remaining Red Road flats, the iconic towers in Glasgow, are to be demolished live as part of the opening ceremony for the Commonwealth Games, I honestly thought it was an April fools joke.

The Red Road estate was a development of eight tower blocks in the north east of Glasgow between Balornock and Barmulloch.

The steel-framed high-rise flats were designed in 1962 by architect Sam Bunton for Glasgow Corporation (later Glasgow City Council) and built between 1964 and 1969.

Six of the eight blocks were traditional point-shaped and had 30 storeys. Two were broader slab-shaped and had 25 storeys. The eight blocks were designed to accommodate about 4,700 people and the early residents welcomed the move from overcrowded and rundown tenement flats into the clean and modern tower blocks.

Here’s a wee promotional British Pathé film about the flats as they were being built.

britishpathe.com/video/homes-in-the-sky/query/glasgow+flats

photo
2 Bedroom flatPullman CourtStreatham£295,000(£5,364 per square metre)
I wish I wanted to live in Streatham. Pullman Court remains remarkably affordable during these crazy bubble times.The site at Pullman Court, according to the residents forum, was acquired by developer Bernstein who recognised that there was a market for good quality accommodation for the young professional classes, who required one and two bedroom flats which are easy to manage and conveniently located for transport to London. To realise his aim, he commissioned a young architect, Frederick Gibberd, then 23 years old, who produced an exciting modern design in keeping with the spirit of the age.There was a considerable opposition to the development, not only because of its striking appearance; it was felt by nearby residents that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution. Eventually this mix was adjusted to include some larger units at the front which could be occupied by young families, and be thought to discourage such activities.Pullman Court comprises five three-storey direct access blocks fronting Streatham hill; two five-storey gallery access blocks along the central driveway and two seven-storey cruciform blocks at the rear of the site overlooking the covered reservoir of the Lambeth waterworks. A total of 218 flats were provided, in a variety of one to four room units.
View this two bedroom, third floor flat here. 2 Bedroom flatPullman CourtStreatham£295,000(£5,364 per square metre)
I wish I wanted to live in Streatham. Pullman Court remains remarkably affordable during these crazy bubble times.The site at Pullman Court, according to the residents forum, was acquired by developer Bernstein who recognised that there was a market for good quality accommodation for the young professional classes, who required one and two bedroom flats which are easy to manage and conveniently located for transport to London. To realise his aim, he commissioned a young architect, Frederick Gibberd, then 23 years old, who produced an exciting modern design in keeping with the spirit of the age.There was a considerable opposition to the development, not only because of its striking appearance; it was felt by nearby residents that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution. Eventually this mix was adjusted to include some larger units at the front which could be occupied by young families, and be thought to discourage such activities.Pullman Court comprises five three-storey direct access blocks fronting Streatham hill; two five-storey gallery access blocks along the central driveway and two seven-storey cruciform blocks at the rear of the site overlooking the covered reservoir of the Lambeth waterworks. A total of 218 flats were provided, in a variety of one to four room units.
View this two bedroom, third floor flat here. 2 Bedroom flatPullman CourtStreatham£295,000(£5,364 per square metre)
I wish I wanted to live in Streatham. Pullman Court remains remarkably affordable during these crazy bubble times.The site at Pullman Court, according to the residents forum, was acquired by developer Bernstein who recognised that there was a market for good quality accommodation for the young professional classes, who required one and two bedroom flats which are easy to manage and conveniently located for transport to London. To realise his aim, he commissioned a young architect, Frederick Gibberd, then 23 years old, who produced an exciting modern design in keeping with the spirit of the age.There was a considerable opposition to the development, not only because of its striking appearance; it was felt by nearby residents that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution. Eventually this mix was adjusted to include some larger units at the front which could be occupied by young families, and be thought to discourage such activities.Pullman Court comprises five three-storey direct access blocks fronting Streatham hill; two five-storey gallery access blocks along the central driveway and two seven-storey cruciform blocks at the rear of the site overlooking the covered reservoir of the Lambeth waterworks. A total of 218 flats were provided, in a variety of one to four room units.
View this two bedroom, third floor flat here. 2 Bedroom flatPullman CourtStreatham£295,000(£5,364 per square metre)
I wish I wanted to live in Streatham. Pullman Court remains remarkably affordable during these crazy bubble times.The site at Pullman Court, according to the residents forum, was acquired by developer Bernstein who recognised that there was a market for good quality accommodation for the young professional classes, who required one and two bedroom flats which are easy to manage and conveniently located for transport to London. To realise his aim, he commissioned a young architect, Frederick Gibberd, then 23 years old, who produced an exciting modern design in keeping with the spirit of the age.There was a considerable opposition to the development, not only because of its striking appearance; it was felt by nearby residents that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution. Eventually this mix was adjusted to include some larger units at the front which could be occupied by young families, and be thought to discourage such activities.Pullman Court comprises five three-storey direct access blocks fronting Streatham hill; two five-storey gallery access blocks along the central driveway and two seven-storey cruciform blocks at the rear of the site overlooking the covered reservoir of the Lambeth waterworks. A total of 218 flats were provided, in a variety of one to four room units.
View this two bedroom, third floor flat here. 2 Bedroom flatPullman CourtStreatham£295,000(£5,364 per square metre)
I wish I wanted to live in Streatham. Pullman Court remains remarkably affordable during these crazy bubble times.The site at Pullman Court, according to the residents forum, was acquired by developer Bernstein who recognised that there was a market for good quality accommodation for the young professional classes, who required one and two bedroom flats which are easy to manage and conveniently located for transport to London. To realise his aim, he commissioned a young architect, Frederick Gibberd, then 23 years old, who produced an exciting modern design in keeping with the spirit of the age.There was a considerable opposition to the development, not only because of its striking appearance; it was felt by nearby residents that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution. Eventually this mix was adjusted to include some larger units at the front which could be occupied by young families, and be thought to discourage such activities.Pullman Court comprises five three-storey direct access blocks fronting Streatham hill; two five-storey gallery access blocks along the central driveway and two seven-storey cruciform blocks at the rear of the site overlooking the covered reservoir of the Lambeth waterworks. A total of 218 flats were provided, in a variety of one to four room units.
View this two bedroom, third floor flat here. 2 Bedroom flatPullman CourtStreatham£295,000(£5,364 per square metre)
I wish I wanted to live in Streatham. Pullman Court remains remarkably affordable during these crazy bubble times.The site at Pullman Court, according to the residents forum, was acquired by developer Bernstein who recognised that there was a market for good quality accommodation for the young professional classes, who required one and two bedroom flats which are easy to manage and conveniently located for transport to London. To realise his aim, he commissioned a young architect, Frederick Gibberd, then 23 years old, who produced an exciting modern design in keeping with the spirit of the age.There was a considerable opposition to the development, not only because of its striking appearance; it was felt by nearby residents that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution. Eventually this mix was adjusted to include some larger units at the front which could be occupied by young families, and be thought to discourage such activities.Pullman Court comprises five three-storey direct access blocks fronting Streatham hill; two five-storey gallery access blocks along the central driveway and two seven-storey cruciform blocks at the rear of the site overlooking the covered reservoir of the Lambeth waterworks. A total of 218 flats were provided, in a variety of one to four room units.
View this two bedroom, third floor flat here.

2 Bedroom flat
Pullman Court
Streatham
£295,000
(£5,364 per square metre)

I wish I wanted to live in Streatham. Pullman Court remains remarkably affordable during these crazy bubble times.
The site at Pullman Court, according to the residents 
forum, was acquired by developer Bernstein who recognised that there was a market for good quality accommodation for the young professional classes, who required one and two bedroom flats which are easy to manage and conveniently located for transport to London. To realise his aim, he commissioned a young architect, Frederick Gibberd, then 23 years old, who produced an exciting modern design in keeping with the spirit of the age.

There was a considerable opposition to the development, not only because of its striking appearance; it was felt by nearby residents that housing for single people was bound to encourage prostitution. Eventually this mix was adjusted to include some larger units at the front which could be occupied by young families, and be thought to discourage such activities.

Pullman Court comprises five three-storey direct access blocks fronting Streatham hill; two five-storey gallery access blocks along the central driveway and two seven-storey cruciform blocks at the rear of the site overlooking the covered reservoir of the Lambeth waterworks. A total of 218 flats were provided, in a variety of one to four room units.

View this two bedroom, third floor flat here.

photo
3 Bedroom houseLamble StreetGospel OakLondon NW5£800,000
A rare opportunity to buy one of only 9 such houses on Lamble Street forming part of the ‘Mansfield Road project’—designed by Scottish architects Benson and Forsyth, who were working under Sydney Cook for the London Borough of Camden’s Architect’s Department.
In 1970 Benson and Forsyth were give two projects — Branch Hill in Hampstead (now Grade II listed—I have never seen a property for sale there, ever, go there, look around, why would you ever move?) and this Mansfield Road/Lamble Street project.
Mansfield Road consists of 73 flats/maisonettes and Lamble Street consist of the 9 family houses. Benson and Forsyth took the ideas of letting maximum light into the living areas and separating adult and child spaces into a third dimension, by separating them laterally as well as vertically.
The houses is arranged over three floors, entering on the raised ground floor, which contains a kitchen/diner under large  conservatory roof light with steps up to the living room. The first floor contains a dual aspect bedroom a which leads up to the roof terrace. The ‘garden floor’ has two further bedrooms. 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom houseLamble StreetGospel OakLondon NW5£800,000
A rare opportunity to buy one of only 9 such houses on Lamble Street forming part of the ‘Mansfield Road project’—designed by Scottish architects Benson and Forsyth, who were working under Sydney Cook for the London Borough of Camden’s Architect’s Department.
In 1970 Benson and Forsyth were give two projects — Branch Hill in Hampstead (now Grade II listed—I have never seen a property for sale there, ever, go there, look around, why would you ever move?) and this Mansfield Road/Lamble Street project.
Mansfield Road consists of 73 flats/maisonettes and Lamble Street consist of the 9 family houses. Benson and Forsyth took the ideas of letting maximum light into the living areas and separating adult and child spaces into a third dimension, by separating them laterally as well as vertically.
The houses is arranged over three floors, entering on the raised ground floor, which contains a kitchen/diner under large  conservatory roof light with steps up to the living room. The first floor contains a dual aspect bedroom a which leads up to the roof terrace. The ‘garden floor’ has two further bedrooms. 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom houseLamble StreetGospel OakLondon NW5£800,000
A rare opportunity to buy one of only 9 such houses on Lamble Street forming part of the ‘Mansfield Road project’—designed by Scottish architects Benson and Forsyth, who were working under Sydney Cook for the London Borough of Camden’s Architect’s Department.
In 1970 Benson and Forsyth were give two projects — Branch Hill in Hampstead (now Grade II listed—I have never seen a property for sale there, ever, go there, look around, why would you ever move?) and this Mansfield Road/Lamble Street project.
Mansfield Road consists of 73 flats/maisonettes and Lamble Street consist of the 9 family houses. Benson and Forsyth took the ideas of letting maximum light into the living areas and separating adult and child spaces into a third dimension, by separating them laterally as well as vertically.
The houses is arranged over three floors, entering on the raised ground floor, which contains a kitchen/diner under large  conservatory roof light with steps up to the living room. The first floor contains a dual aspect bedroom a which leads up to the roof terrace. The ‘garden floor’ has two further bedrooms. 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom houseLamble StreetGospel OakLondon NW5£800,000
A rare opportunity to buy one of only 9 such houses on Lamble Street forming part of the ‘Mansfield Road project’—designed by Scottish architects Benson and Forsyth, who were working under Sydney Cook for the London Borough of Camden’s Architect’s Department.
In 1970 Benson and Forsyth were give two projects — Branch Hill in Hampstead (now Grade II listed—I have never seen a property for sale there, ever, go there, look around, why would you ever move?) and this Mansfield Road/Lamble Street project.
Mansfield Road consists of 73 flats/maisonettes and Lamble Street consist of the 9 family houses. Benson and Forsyth took the ideas of letting maximum light into the living areas and separating adult and child spaces into a third dimension, by separating them laterally as well as vertically.
The houses is arranged over three floors, entering on the raised ground floor, which contains a kitchen/diner under large  conservatory roof light with steps up to the living room. The first floor contains a dual aspect bedroom a which leads up to the roof terrace. The ‘garden floor’ has two further bedrooms. 
View the listing here. 3 Bedroom houseLamble StreetGospel OakLondon NW5£800,000
A rare opportunity to buy one of only 9 such houses on Lamble Street forming part of the ‘Mansfield Road project’—designed by Scottish architects Benson and Forsyth, who were working under Sydney Cook for the London Borough of Camden’s Architect’s Department.
In 1970 Benson and Forsyth were give two projects — Branch Hill in Hampstead (now Grade II listed—I have never seen a property for sale there, ever, go there, look around, why would you ever move?) and this Mansfield Road/Lamble Street project.
Mansfield Road consists of 73 flats/maisonettes and Lamble Street consist of the 9 family houses. Benson and Forsyth took the ideas of letting maximum light into the living areas and separating adult and child spaces into a third dimension, by separating them laterally as well as vertically.
The houses is arranged over three floors, entering on the raised ground floor, which contains a kitchen/diner under large  conservatory roof light with steps up to the living room. The first floor contains a dual aspect bedroom a which leads up to the roof terrace. The ‘garden floor’ has two further bedrooms. 
View the listing here.

3 Bedroom house
Lamble Street
Gospel Oak
London NW5

£800,000

A rare opportunity to buy one of only 9 such houses on Lamble Street forming part of the ‘Mansfield Road project’—designed by Scottish architects Benson and Forsyth, who were working under Sydney Cook for the London Borough of Camden’s Architect’s Department.

In 1970 Benson and Forsyth were give two projects — Branch Hill in Hampstead (now Grade II listed—I have never seen a property for sale there, ever, go there, look around, why would you ever move?) and this Mansfield Road/Lamble Street project.

Mansfield Road consists of 73 flats/maisonettes and Lamble Street consist of the 9 family houses. Benson and Forsyth took the ideas of letting maximum light into the living areas and separating adult and child spaces into a third dimension, by separating them laterally as well as vertically.

The houses is arranged over three floors, entering on the raised ground floor, which contains a kitchen/diner under large  conservatory roof light with steps up to the living room. The first floor contains a dual aspect bedroom a which leads up to the roof terrace. The ‘garden floor’ has two further bedrooms. 

View the listing here.