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Modernist Estates

Listing modernist homes for sale, focussing on London post-war estates, plus findings on the way, including books, interviews, films and upcoming events. I also do this: thingsyoucanbuy.co.uk
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1 Bedroom flat Shepherds Hill  London N6 £400,000(£7,353 per square metre)
There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flat Shepherds Hill  London N6 £400,000(£7,353 per square metre)
There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.
View the listing here. 1 Bedroom flat Shepherds Hill  London N6 £400,000(£7,353 per square metre)
There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.
View the listing here.

1 Bedroom flat
Shepherds Hill
London N6
£400,000
(£7,353 per square metre)

There’s a lot of blocks like this in Highgate, I really need to have a wander about there to see what’s what. I don’t know much about this flat, except for the fact that it came onto the market in May at £470,000 and has been steadily reduced ever since. Now at £400,000 it sounds more reasonable. The downside is that it’s only on the first floor, but there’s a generous living room with a small private balcony, a double bedroom and kitchen and bathroom that you may want to rip out, and a garage.

View the listing here.

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4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here. 4 Bedroom HouseClare Drive EdgbastonBirmingham£450,000(£2680 per square metre)
Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 
For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here.

4 Bedroom House
Clare Drive 
Edgbaston
Birmingham
£450,000
(£2680 per square metre)

Designed by architect John Madin, Clare Drive and Grehfell Drive is a private development of two terraces of 4 bedroom houses within shared grounds completed in 1965.

John Madin, born in 1924, was responsible for a huge number of projects in Birmingham including the now threatened Central Library. 

For sale is this 4 bedroom house which still retains a lot of original features, it’s big too! View the listing here.

photo
London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Royal Festival Hall London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Churchill Gardens Pumphouse, on the cover of L'architecture d'aujord'hui London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Golden Lane Estate London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Fulwell Cross Library London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Perronet House London Open House20–21 September 2014Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:
31b St Mary’s RoadSW19 7BPOne of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.
Saturday: 10am–4pmEvent/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 
Whittington Estate8 Stoneleigh Terrace(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)N19 5TYBuilt during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 
Sunday: 10am-to-5pmNB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.Last tour 4pmTube: Archway
Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, NW8 0SFThe last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Swiss CottageArchitect: Neave BrownYear Built: 1968–79Balfron TowerSt Leonard’s Road E14 0QTTrellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.
Saturday: 1–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis.Last tour 4.30pmDLR: All Saints, Langdon Park
Cressingham GardensRotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QNLow-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.
Saturday: 10am–5pm Sunday:10am–5pmRegular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.Entry: Rotunda, private homes.Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Herne Hill, BrixtonArchitect: Ted HollambyYear Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QYUnlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918Last entry 4.45pmTube: Notting Hill Gate;Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel StepanskyYear Built 1970
Fullwell Cross Library140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EAThe library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.
Saturday: 9.30am–4pmTalk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.Last entry 3.30pmTube: Barkingside, FairlopArchitect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C ConnellYear Built: 1958–68
Golden Lane Estate4 Bayer HouseEC1Y 0RNPart of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.
Sunday: 11am–5pmHalf-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.Last tour 4.30pmTube: BarbicanArchitect: Chamberlin, Powell & BonYear Built: 1957
Greenside Primary SchoolWestville Road, W12 9PTOne of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.
Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.Last entry 4.30pmTube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;Architect: Goldfinger, ErnoYear Built: 1952
Guildhall LibraryAldermanbury EC2V 7HHPurpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.
Saturday: 9.30am–5pmHalf-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son PartnersYear Built: 1974
Haggerston SchoolWeymouth Terrace, E2 8LSGrade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.
Saturday: 1–4.30pmHourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.Last Entry TimeLast tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.Tube: HoxtonArchitect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti ArchitectsYear Built: 1963-65/2011

HighpointNorth Hill, N6 4BAGrade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.
Saturday: 10am-to-5pmRegular tours, pre-book ONLY at http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.Tube: HighgateArchitect: Lubetkin & Tecton
Langham House Close, FlatsHam Common, TW10 7JEA landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.
Saturday: 10am–5pmFirst come basis, queuing if necessary.Last entry 5pm.Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.Rail: Richmond, Kingston;then 65 bus to Ham CommonArchitect: Stirling and GowanYear Built: 1958

Perronet House48, 74 & 79 Perronet House, Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)Elephant and Castle SE1 6JSPurpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.
Saturday: 1–5pmFirst come basisLast entry 4.45pmTube/Rail: Elephant & CastleArchitect: Sir Roger WaltersYear Built: 1970
Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road SW1V 3JFChurchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.
Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm Regular tours, first come basis.Last entry 4.30pmTube: PimlicoArchitect: Powell and MoyaYear Built: 1950

Pullman CourtStreatham Hill, SW2 4SZGrade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.
Sunday: 11am–5pmDisplay of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’Tube/Rail: Brixton;Rail: Streatham HillArchitect: Frederick GibberdYear Built: 1936
Quaker Meeting House, Wanstead, Bush RoadE11 3AUModernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.
Sunday: 1–5pmLast entry 5.15pmEntry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadowTube: LeytonstoneArchitect: Norman FrithYear Built: 1968

Royal Festival HallBelvedere Road, SE1 8XXThe major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.
Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.
Tube: EmbankmentTube/Rail: Charing Cross, WaterlooArchitect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)Year Built: 1951/2007The Pioneer Health CentreSt Mary’s Road, SE15 2EEGrade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.
Sunday: 11am–2pmHourly tours, first come basis. Photographic display of building’s former use.Last tour 1pmHow to get thereTube/Rail: New Cross Gate;Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;Architect: Sir E Owen WilliamsYear Built: 1935
8 & 10 Walters WayHonor Oak Park, SE23 3LHA close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.
Sunday 1–6pmRegular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.Last entry 5.45pmRail/Overground: Honor Oak ParkArchitect: Walter SegalYear Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walkMeet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre StreetSW10 0DSDesigned by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.
Duration 2 hours.Tube: Sloane Square, Earls CourtArchitect: Eric Lyons (Principal)Year Built: 1969–76
Full listings on the Open House website. Pullman Court

London Open House
20–21 September 2014
Open House weekend is nearly upon us again so it’s time to top up your Oyster card and get snooping around London’s finest architecture. As per last year, the Open House website is as intuitive as a brick, so I’ve done the selfless task of filtering through it. Here is my edit of the queues you may want to join:

31b St Mary’s Road
SW19 7BP
One of a small number of Peter Foggo, single storey, flat roofed houses inspired by the US Case Study Houses scheme and Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, with skylights, two wings, mahogany panelling and floor-to-ceiling windows. A large open-plan living room looks out onto a landscaped garden.

Saturday: 10am–4pm
Event/Entry Details: Closed 12-2pm. Half-hourly tours, pre-book ONLY on jaci2000@fastmail.co.uk 

Whittington Estate
8 Stoneleigh Terrace
(Highgate New Town, Stage 1)
N19 5TY
Built during the golden era of Camden public housing by Peter Tabori. 

Sunday: 10am-to-5pm
NB. Closed 1–2pm. Tours on the hour.
Last tour 4pm
Tube: Archway

Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate
13(b) Rowley Way, Abbey Road, 
NW8 0SF
The last large social housing complex in London – a low-rise, high-density enclave. Terraced housing reinterpreted. Listed Grade II* in 1993. Flat virtually as originally designed.

Saturday: 10am–5pm
First come basis, queuing if necessary. Regular tours.
Last entry 4.30pm
Tube: Swiss Cottage
Architect: Neave Brown
Year Built: 1968–79

Balfron Tower
St Leonard’s Road E14 0QT
Trellick Tower’s older, shorter, and lesser known sister. Grade II listed 27-storey block designed in the brutalist style for the London County Council by Erno Goldfinger.

Saturday: 1–5pm
Half-hourly tours, first come basis.
Last tour 4.30pm
DLR: All Saints, Langdon Park

Cressingham Gardens
Rotunda, Tulse Hill SW2 2QN

Low-rise leafy estate located next to beautiful Brockwell Park noted for its innovative design, incorporating pioneering architectural elements and echoing the natural topography.

Saturday: 10am–5pm 
Sunday:10am–5pm
Regular tours, first come basis. Exhibition in Rotunda.
Entry: Rotunda, private homes.
Tube/Rail: Brixton;
Rail: Herne Hill, Brixton
Architect: Ted Hollamby
Year Built: 1967–78

Embassy of the Czech Republic
26 Kensington Palace Gardens, W8 4QY

Unlike so many examples of precast concrete buildings which are weathering badly, this is a refined example of its kind, skilfully detailed technically and aesthetically. RIBA Award Winner 1971.

Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm 
First come basis, queuing if necessary. Exhibition on War Photographers 1914–1918
Last entry 4.45pm
Tube: Notting Hill Gate;
Architect: Jan Bocan, Jan Sramek and Karel Stepansky
Year Built 1970

Fullwell Cross Library
140 High Street, Barkingside, Ilford, IG6 2EA
The library was built together with the swimming baths on an open site in Barkingside High Street. The circular library design copies the nearby roundabout. The complex is set back from the pavement and was intended to form a new local civic centre with a public space. Refurbished in 1990 and 2011.

Saturday: 9.30am–4pm
Talk 2pm ‘Every Town Needs A Crown: Frederick Gibberd and Fulwell Cross’.
Last entry 3.30pm
Tube: Barkingside, Fairlop
Architect: Frederick Gibberd/Coombes & Partners/H C Connell
Year Built: 1958–68

Golden Lane Estate
4 Bayer House
EC1Y 0RN
Part of Golden Lane Estate which was the first public housing to be listed. A maisonette with many of the original detailing and finishes.

Sunday: 11am–5pm
Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Closed between 1pm and 2pm.
Last tour 4.30pm
Tube: Barbican
Architect: Chamberlin, Powell & Bon
Year Built: 1957

Greenside Primary School
Westville Road, W12 9PT
One of only 2 schools designed using Goldfinger’s school building system — precast reinforced concrete frame with brick infill. Fine, top-lit mural by Gordon Cullen. Grade II* listed.

Saturday and Sunday 1–5pm 
Half-hourly tours, first come basis. Children’s worksheet/trail.
Last entry 4.30pm
Tube: Shepherd’s Bush Market, Goldhawk Road, Ravenscourt Park;
Architect: Goldfinger, Erno
Year Built: 1952

Guildhall Library
Aldermanbury EC2V 7HH

Purpose built over 5 floors to house printed books and manuscripts. Features include old pneumatic tubes system and 56 listed translucent pyramid roof lights.

Saturday: 9.30am–5pm
Half-hourly tours 10am-3.30pm lasting 45mins, first come basis.
Tube: Bank, St Paul’s, Mansion House;
Architect: Sir Giles Scott, Son Partners
Year Built: 1974

Haggerston School
Weymouth Terrace, E2 8LS
Grade II listed mixed comprehensive secondary school, retaining many original features. Distinctive for the large amount of timber used in the construction and contains some of Goldfinger’s boldest and most handsome public interiors, including bush hammered concrete and coffered ceilings in the entrance and assembly hall block. Major refurbishment recently completed as part of BSF programme.

Saturday: 1–4.30pm
Hourly tours from 1.30pm, first come basis. Tours led by parents who are architects. Presentation running in the hall and visuals of the school from past and present.
Last Entry Time
Last tour 3.30pm. Last entry 4pm.
Tube: Hoxton
Architect: Erno Goldfinger & Hubert Bennett/Avanti Architects
Year Built: 1963-65/2011

Highpoint
North Hill, N6 4BA
Grade I listed Modernist apartment blocks retaining many original features.

Saturday: 10am-to-5pm
Regular tours, pre-book ONLY at 
http://ohlhighpoint.eventbrite.co.uk from 1 Sep.
Entry: (by accompanied tour only) common parts, including restored foyers and interior of a flat. NB. No photographs within the buildings or gardens, please.
Tube: Highgate
Architect: Lubetkin & Tecton


Langham House Close, Flats
Ham Common, TW10 7JE
A landmark in ‘Brutalism’. Exposed shuttered concrete and brick construction with iconic oversized concrete ‘gargoyles’ and geometric fenestration. Interior features exposed brick chimney/mantle/squint and architect-designed cupboards.

Saturday: 10am–5pm
First come basis, queuing if necessary.
Last entry 5pm.
Entry: entrance hall to flats 25-30, interior of flat 7.
Rail: Richmond, Kingston;
then 65 bus to Ham Common
Architect: Stirling and Gowan
Year Built: 1958

Perronet House
48, 74 & 79 Perronet House,

Princess Street (buzz flat 74 to enter)
Elephant and Castle SE1 6JS
Purpose-built council block with scissor construction flats with spectacular views of Elephant & Castle roundabout. Commended in 1971 Good Design in Housing Awards. Detailed historical notes and images shown. One flat significantly remodelled in 2012.

Saturday: 1–5pm
First come basis
Last entry 4.45pm
Tube/Rail: Elephant & Castle
Architect: Sir Roger Walters
Year Built: 1970

Pimlico District Heating Undertaking (PDHU)
The Pumphouse, Churchill Gardens Road

SW1V 3JF
Churchill Garden Estate used energy from waste heat from Battersea Power Station when it was functional. The Pumphouse still provides low carbon heating to Pimlico from combined heat and power engines and has the UK’s largest thermal store.

Saturday and Sunday: 10am–5pm 
Regular tours, first come basis.
Last entry 4.30pm
Tube: Pimlico
Architect: Powell and Moya
Year Built: 1950

Pullman Court
Streatham Hill, SW2 4SZ
Grade II* listed Modern Movement building, with balcony walkways and period internal features.

Sunday: 11am–5pm
Display of site-specific art works ‘A Happier alternative to What’s going on’ —and a photographic exhibition of Venezuelan mid 20th Century architecture: ‘Modernism Caracas’
Tube/Rail: Brixton;
Rail: Streatham Hill
Architect: Frederick Gibberd
Year Built: 1936

Quaker Meeting House,
Wanstead, Bush Road
E11 3AU
Modernist building based on four hexagons within an Epping Forest setting. Contains a sunny meeting room for Quaker worship facing onto a wooded burial ground of simple headstones, including that of Elizabeth Fry.

Sunday: 1–5pm
Last entry 5.15pm
Entry: foyer, meeting room, social room, kitchen, grounds, wildflower meadow
Tube: Leytonstone
Architect: Norman Frith
Year Built: 1968

Royal Festival Hall
Belvedere Road, SE1 8XX
The major refurbishment of Royal Festival Hall has enhanced the acoustics and comfort to world class standards, increased audience facilities and accessibility, and created an entirely new education and learning centre. RIBA Award Winner 2008.

Saturday and Sunday 10am–11pm 
Behind the scenes tours at 10.30am, 12.30pm, 2.30pm, first come basis, duration 1 hour. NB. Due to nature of areas covered, no children under 16 and unsuitable for those with vertigo or special access requirements. No high heels or big bags.

Tube: Embankment
Tube/Rail: Charing Cross, Waterloo
Architect: LCC Architects Department/Allies and Morrison (refurb)
Year Built: 1951/2007

The Pioneer Health Centre
St Mary’s Road, SE15 2EE
Grade II* listed Modernist building, famously described by Walter Gropius as “an oasis of glass in a desert of brick”. Originally built to house ‘The Peckham Experiment’ an innovative health centre in the 30s. It was converted to private dwellings in 2000, retaining the original indoor pool.

Sunday: 11am–2pm
Hourly tours, first come basis.
Photographic display of building’s former use.
Last tour 1pm
How to get there
Tube/Rail: New Cross Gate;
Rail: Queens Road, Peckham;
Architect: Sir E Owen Williams
Year Built: 1935

8 & 10 Walters Way
Honor Oak Park, SE23 3LH
A close of 13 self-built houses. Each house is unique, many extended and built using a method developed by Walter Segal, who led the project in the 1980s. Both houses have benefited from extensions and renovations. Sustainable features include solar electric, water and space heating.

Sunday 1–6pm
Regular tours, first come basis. Videos of Segal buildings and self-build showing.
Last entry 5.45pm
Rail/Overground: Honor Oak Park
Architect: Walter Segal
Year Built: 1987

World’s End Estate walk
Meet: Sun 2.30pm, 4.30pm at 16 Blantyre Street

SW10 0DS
Designed by Eric Lyons and constructed in the mid-70s, the World’s End Estate is a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland facades through the use of alternative designs and materials.

Duration 2 hours.
Tube: Sloane Square, Earls Court
Architect: Eric Lyons (Principal)
Year Built: 1969–76

Full listings on the Open House website.

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1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year. 1 Bedroom flat Lulot GardensWhittington EstateLondon N19£425,000(£8891 per square metre)
Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.
On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.
View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year.

1 Bedroom flat
Lulot Gardens
Whittington Estate
London N19
£425,000
(£8891 per square metre)

Overlooking Highgate cemetery, the Whittington Estate forms part of Highate New Town. It was  built in the mid seventies and designed by Hungarian born Peter Tábori — part of the London Borough of Camden Department of Architecture, who were also behind the Brunswick Centre and Alexandra Road. Aesthetically the Whittington Estate bares resemblance to these schemes (referred to as the ‘Camden style’), with it’s stepped balconies and strong lines. The buildings were carefully planned to provide spatially interesting and useful rooms with generous windows and terraces and high standard of internal finishes.

On the market is this one bedroom flat on the raised ground floor, which will need some attention.

View the listing here.

PS. They were under £300,000 this time last year.

photo
2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flatO’Donnel CourtBrunwick CentreLondon WC1£900,000(£13,091 per square metre)
My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 
If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
O’Donnel Court
Brunwick Centre
London WC1
£900,000
(£13,091 per square metre)

My eyes bleeding! The price of this flat in Patrick Hodgkinson’s Brunswick Centre (read our profile on resident Vicky Richardson for more on the history) is more than the cost of a Barbican flat. Could this be the most expensive ex-council flat in London? Amazing what a lick of paint and a few high street shops can do. 

If I sound bitter, I am. I am kicking myself that I didn’t buy one of these flats 10 years ago.

View the listing here.

video

Doreen

Doreen has lived in a high rise on Elephant and Castle’s Heygate Estate since it was built in the early 70s. Just 30-years later the estate is up for re-development. Doreen reminisces about the culture of the estate when it was in it’s prime, and what went wrong.

Film by David Reeve and Patrick Steel.

(Source: youtube.com)

video

Front Row, BBC Radio 4
Aylesbury and Heygate

The Aylesbury and Heygate estates in South London have served as the backdrop for countless films and TV dramas over the years, including Spooks, The Bill and Harry Brown. But now residents have had enough and all filming has been banned. John visited the estates to find out more.

Originally broadcast February 2012

(Source: youtube.com)

video

Nairn Across Britain
From London to Lancashire

First transmitted in 1972, Ian Nairn takes a journey to the industrial North and finds plenty to comment about in a landscape of surprises.

(Source: youtube.com)

photo
Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here. Studio flatWorld’s End EstateLondon SW10£450,000
A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 
Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.
View the listing here.

Studio flat
World’s End Estate
London SW10
£450,000

A studio flat on the 4th floor of this Eric Lyon’s designed estate. The estate comprises if 7 high rise blocks of varying height, interlinked by 9 low-rise blocks. It was constructed in the mid-70s, and was a deliberate architectural attempt to not only overcome many of the issues of previous high-rise developments, but also to eliminate monotonous and bland façades through the use of alternative designs and materials. 

Read more on the estate on the excellent Municipal Dreams website.

View the listing here.

photo
2 Bedroom flat65 Ladbroke GroveLondon W11£895,000
A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat65 Ladbroke GroveLondon W11£895,000
A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 
View the listing here. 2 Bedroom flat65 Ladbroke GroveLondon W11£895,000
A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 
View the listing here.

2 Bedroom flat
65 Ladbroke Grove
London W11
£895,000

A two bedroom flat situated on the third floor of this Maxwell Fry designed building. Built in in 1938, it’s an early example of a modern block of flats, and was Grade II listed in 1984. It consists of 4 storeys (with four flats in each floor) plus a penthouse (designed by R Myerscough Walker). It was built for the ‘professional and business classes’. 

View the listing here.

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2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here 2 Bedroom flatEmanuel HouseSouth Croxted RoadLondon SE21£360,000
I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.
Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 
I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.
The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here

2 Bedroom flat
Emanuel House
South Croxted Road
London SE21
£360,000

I first spotted this block in Dulwich last year. There was one bedroom flat for sale £176,000 and I was almost tempted. Twelve months on and that price sounds ridiculous.

Emanuel House was designed by architecture practice Hutchinson Locke and Monk — maybe better known for their work on the Paisley Civic Centre. 

I managed to track down a contact for Tony Monk to try and find out more about the block, he promptly replied, ‘It was one of the first co-ownership scheme at the time when ladies could not otherwise get mortgages. It was also the pioneering scheme by the Richmond Green Housing Society. We then re-formed into the Acton Housing Association which was then absorbed into A2 Dominion Housing Association who are one of London’s largest social housing providers.

The vicar of Emanuel Church Rev David McKeeman who was my client when we built the Emanuel church and Youth Centre from the sale of the Emanuel Housing land. It is not my best building, but the concept came after seeing Moshe Safdie’s Habitat at Montreal World Fair 67’

View the listing here

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Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here. Studio flatLillington GardensLondon SW1£360,000(£9,772 per square metre)
You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 
More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.View the listing here.

Studio flat
Lillington Gardens
London SW1
£360,000
(£9,772 per square metre)

You’re going to have to rip everything out and start again here. And there’s not enough room to swing a Bojensen wooden monkey—but there are stairs, stairs! You enter the flat from the third floor, and go down the stairs to the second. I think. What I wouldn’t do for a set of stairs in my shoebox! 

More on Darbourne and Darke’s Lillington Gardens here.
View the listing here.

photo
Modernist homes under £250,000
Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 
Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here. Modernist homes under £250,000
Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 
Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here. Modernist homes under £250,000
Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 
Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here.

Modernist homes under £250,000

Here’s the first of a few postings I’m going to list of homes under the stamp duty threshold of £250,000. They really are few and far between these days in London, and often if they are they are either shoeboxes, or cash only purchases only. I’ve come across a few that I think are worth mentioning, not all well known modernist buildings, but worth a look nevertheless. 

Up first is this 2 bedroom flat in Cypress Lodge in South Norwood. It’s not a particularly exciting looking block, but the floor to ceiling windows in the living room drew my eye, it’s split level and it looks like there’s decent amount of space—it also benefits from it’s own garage. It’s been reduced from £260,000 from when it was first listed, so they are obviously keen to sell. View the listing here.

photo
Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva TylerPullman Court London SW2
This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.
Tell us a bit about yourself and where you liveI’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 
How long have you lived here?28 years.
Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.
Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.
How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.
What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.
What are the neighbours like?An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.
Best things about living here?My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.
Worst thing about living here?The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.
Finally, money no object, where would you live?Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.

Eva Tyler
Pullman Court
London SW2

This is the second time I have visited Eva’s home. The first time was last summer when I was lucky enough to get a tour of her flat and the ‘estate’, including access to the magnificent roof terrace, as part of a Twentieth Century Society walk. I was delighted when she kindly invited me back to tell me a bit more about this Grade II* Modernist gem.

Tell us a bit about yourself and where you live
I’m currently in the middle of a year out doing a masters degree. Pullman Court was built in 1936 by the, then, very young architect Frederick Gibberd, it was a private  and remains a private development. His inspiration included Lawn Road flats and the usual continental  suspects. I think it’s his best work. The 218 flats are arranged in three blocks, set back from Streatham High Road. We participate in Open House each year, and I open my flat mainly because I seem to have the most original features. Gibberd designed all the fittings and what I did not find when I moved in I’ve cannabalised from what other people have thrown away when they’ve refurbished their flats. So I’ve got the original door handles – chrome ‘D’s and mushroom knobs – some lighting, radiators, electric fire and so on. The knocker on the front door is a small delight.  The block is often used for film and photoshoots, it’s got that modernist photogenic quality, good gardens and views from the roof. 

How long have you lived here?
28 years.

Did you know much about the place before you moved in, what attracted you to living here?
I didn’t know anything. When I first walked up the driveway between the blocks I got the vibe, it was a wreck then but still a very satisfying space. The flat seemed to be all windows with built in storage in every room, and it felt very large – the double-width hallways and all those windows make it feel bigger than it actually is.

Most banks don’t like lending on non-standard construction buildings, did you have any problems in getting a mortgage?
No problems, but it was a while ago. Some people have had problems over the years but they keep moving in, so its possible.

How much are the service charges, and what do you get for your money?
The service charges are about average for flats in Streatham. Here we pay each year into a reserve fund and save up, so the major works we have needed to do aren’t a shock.

What about the communal areas, are they well maintained?
Beautifully. When I moved in the block was on the buildings at risk register. A lot of hard work and a lot of investment has brought it back to life and there’s no going back. We have a team of caretakers and a managing agent who are rigorous about keeping the site in good condition and work with the residents on improvements.

What are the neighbours like?
An interesting, mixed crowd. Some have been here longer than me and there are plenty of younger folk who have moved in for the architecture.

Best things about living here?
My flat works for me and is always a pleasure – today the sun is pouring into my living room. Plus, I’m in the back block, so its quiet, but good transport links are just at the end of the drive.

Worst thing about living here?
The flats can get damp if you don’t ventilate well. The old airbricks got blocked up years ago and the flats weren’t designed for modern heating systems.

Finally, money no object, where would you live?
Nearer to Vitra and Ronchamp.